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Field Notes

Remembering the Monarch Tractor

monarch tractor ad 

In the February 2017 issue of Farm Collector, Dan Jacobs raised the questions of how long the Monarch name and its steering system may have been used. While not settling those issues, the enclosed ad from the Nov. 27, 1918, issue of Motor World shows an early Monarch. The Monarch Tractor Co. is listed as operating in Watertown, Wisconsin. The 1929 Farm Implement News Buyer Guide lists a Monarch Tractor Corp. in Springfield, Illinois. This indicates some kind of management change.

Clyde Eide, Bryan, Texas


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Peach of a John Deere Spreader

spreader 

This John Deere LF10 spreader (serial no. 28781) was found under a shed in Burke County, Georgia. To my knowledge, it was used to spread lime and kept clean, as it was found in 95 percent good condition. This type of spreader was manufactured until the 1970s by several companies in various sizes. I found the bias-ply tires through a used tractor and parts dealer.

Wayne A. Beggs, Lincolnton, Georgia


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Hatchery Business in the Late 1920s

hatchery 

Great incubator article (“Chicken and the Egg: Incubators eased work of farm wife’s chore,” Farm Collector, April 2017).

I’ve enclosed a photo of my grandparents in front of their hatchery in Brookville, Indiana. Gus and Katherine are shown, with their son, Roy, on the running board of the Overland Sedan. This photo was taken in 1927 or ’28, according to Roy.

Jim Glascock, Cedar Grove, Indiana


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Restoring an Allis-Chalmers Model B

 allis-chalmers model b tractor

I did all the restoration work on this 1939 Allis-Chalmers Model B myself. It took two full years to complete. I am real proud of the way it turned out. It gets so many compliments at tractor shows. I enjoy speaking to all of the people passing by, and educating them on the rich history of this tractor, and answering any questions they might have. I will be 73 years old this year, and am finding it more important than ever to help educate the younger generation on the overall importance of the antique tractor, hoping that some of the history is carried on.

William Manszewski, Dearborn, Michigan


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Restoring a 1948 Ford Tractor

ford tractor

1948 ford

I bought this tractor in October 2015. The engine was locked up, the tires were flat and it was real rusty. This tractor was bought new in 1948 by a farmer on a small farm. When he died, it was given to his son, who stored it in a barn for 20 years. He gave it to his son-in-law, who parked it outside for five years until I bought it. In April 2016, I paraded it for the first time. I have taken it to two other parades and a show at the Illinois State Fair since then. We did not have to rebuild the engine. It runs very good. I am part-owner of Heubner Tires, Inc., with my son and grandson, so I knew where to buy tires.

Jim Heubner, Petersburg, Illinois


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Caterpillar’s Entry into the Grader Business

 Russell grader

gear wheel
The gear wheel reads, “The Russell Traction Special, MFG by the Russell Grader Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, MN Pat. Aug. 28, 1910.” This Russell grader has an 8-foot moldboard.

This is in regard to the article on the Caterpillar grader in the February 2017 issue of Farm Collector. The Russell grader shown in these photos belonged to the local township; I can remember it being used in the 1940s and ’50s. I purchased it in the 1970s to use to grade small jobs round our ranch and it is still used from time to time. When Caterpillar bought Russell in 1928, that put Caterpillar in the grader business.

Willard Ottman, Lemmon, South Dakota


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Farm Collector Readers to the Rescue

culitvator

culitvator

I am a collector and restorer of antique horse-drawn farm machinery. I recently restored a 1912 corn surface cultivator manufactured by J.D. Tower & Sons Co., Mendota, Illinois (see photos). During the restoration, I needed information about original paint colors for the machine. I wrote a letter to the editor of Farm Collector, asking for information on factory paint colors. The letter appeared in the July 2016 issue.

I am pleased to report I received many letters and phone calls from Farm Collector readers. I would like to thank the following who supplied me with much-needed information: Nic Papenburg, Shipshewana, Indiana; Don Copa, Little Falls, Minnesota; Robert (Butch) Hansen Jr., a Duluth, Minnesota machinist, who made the many missing parts; and others who helped on this project.

One of my next projects will be another early horse-drawn cultivator, an Adams made by Marseilles Mfg. Co., Marseilles, Illinois. This machine has been outside for more than 100 years and I will need the original paint colors on it also. If anyone has that information, please call or write to me.

Wesley Ahlberg, 5253 Lavaque Jct. Rd., Hermantown, MN 55811;
(218) 591-6721


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com