Cornhusking Contests Keep History Alive

National Cornhuskers Assn. hosts cornhusking contests throughout the Midwest each fall

A field of corn is carved with channels referred to as “lands.” Each husker is assigned to a specific land. Here, the tractor-drawn wagon, husker and gleaner are barely visible through a wall of corn. A high wall on one side of the wagon is the “bangboard”: as huskers toss ears, the bangboard acts like a basketball goal’s backboard in stopping them.
A field of corn is carved with channels referred to as “lands.” Each husker is assigned to a specific land. Here, the tractor-drawn wagon, husker and gleaner are barely visible through a wall of corn. A high wall on one side of the wagon is the “bangboard”: as huskers toss ears, the bangboard acts like a basketball goal’s backboard in stopping them.
Photo by Terri McManus