Steam Engines
The antique steam traction engine hobby, past and present.

Buffalo-Springfield Road Roller

A 1928 Buffalo-Springfield road roller is at the heart of a Washington man's life-long love affair with steam.

For the Love of Steam Traction Engines

A Missouri man donates his time and labor to keep antique steam traction engines running.

Explore more articles that document the past and present of the antique steam engine hobby:
Antique Steam Engines
Steam Engine Company History
Steam Engine Collections
Iron-Men Album/Steam Traction Archive

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Songs of the
Iron Men

Enjoy the glory days of steam farming with Songs of the Iron Men – a 12 song audio CD of original music by editor Christian Williams based on poems originally submitted to Iron-Men Album in the 1950s. Listen to one of the songs on Christian’s blog, The Water Hopper.

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Baker Fan

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FIAT TRACTORS FROM 1919 TO THE PRESENT

Fiat's first agricultural tractor was presented to the civil and military authorities of Turin in 1918 and marketed the following year by the Federation of Agricultural Consortia. This book uses original photographic documentation to illustrate the origins and development of the company's agricultural products, tackling the technical and human aspects of a story that has seen the introduction of more than 500 models since 1918. This is the first comprehensive study of the Turin-based firm's history in the agricultural sector. This updated edition includes all the New Holland new series presented from 2008 up to 2011.

$59.95

Looking over the vast open plains of eastern Colorado, western Kansas and southwestern Nebraska, where one can travel miles without seeing a town or even a house, it is hard to imagine the crowded landscape of the last decades of the 19th century. In those days farmers, speculators, and town builders flooded the region, believing that rain would follow the plow and that the "Rainbelt" would become their agricultural Eden. It took a mere decade for drought and economic turmoil to drive these dreaming thousands from the land, turning farmland back to rangeland and reducing settlements to ghost towns.

David J. Wishart's The Last Days of the Rainbelt is the sobering tale of the rapid rise and decline of the settlement of the western Great Plains. History finds its voice in interviews with elderly residents of the region by Civil Works Administration employees in 1933 and 1934. Evidence similarly emerges from land records, climate reports, census records and diaries, as Wishart deftly tracks the expansion of westward settlement across the central plains and into the Rainbelt. Through an examination of migration patterns, land laws, town-building, and agricultural practices, Wishart re-creates the often-difficult life of settlers in a semiarid region who undertook the daunting task of adapting to a new environment. His book brings this era of American settlement and failure on the western Great Plains fully into the scope of historical memory.

$29.95