1976 STUMPTOWN SHOW REPORT

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Route 2, Box 332, Adena, Ohio 43901

The 1976 Stumptown Show was very fortunate to have two days of dry sunny weather for their annual reunion on September 11 & 12. A large crowd atended the show both days. Memberships were bought from Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan and New York. Exhibitors came from Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan and New York. Exhibitors came from Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Kentucky. The exhibitor who traveled the fartherest was Jess Dobson from Greenburgh, Kentucky, who journeyed 425 miles with gas engines.

The Ladies Auxiliary of our show, who sponsor a Queen and a Thresherman of the Year, selected Miss Rosa Shultz of Jewett, Ohio as the Queen and Clarence Saffell of Belmont, Ohio, a 50 year Thresherman, as the Thresherman of the Year. A Bicentennial quilt was raffled off and the winner was Mrs. Elsie Arnold of New Athens, Ohio. Also an afghan was auctioned off to the highest bidder.

A slow engine race was held both Saturday and Sunday and a trophy was awarded each day. Randy Shrider of Marietta, Ohio was the trophy winner on Sasturday, operating the 24 H.P. Greyhound owned by William & Edgar Flowers of Adena, Ohio. Elmer Wenger of Dalton, Ohio was the Sunday trophy winner, operating a 18 H.P. Frick owned by John Sell of Lisbon, Ohio. A strange coincidence is that both engineers were guest engineers on both of the winning engines.

After the parade on Saturday evening a whistle blow was held. Both large and small whistles were bought in to be blown. Several of these whistles had been silent for years and were heard for the first time by the present owners.

At 8:00 on Saturday evening, an 'Old Time Fiddlers Contest' was held with trophies given in two categories, under 60 and over 60 years of age. Gene Dudley of Cumberland, Ohio took 1st prize in the over 60 category and Donald Wilson of Flushing, Ohio took first prize in the under 60 category. Eleven fiddlers entered the contest. After the contest all the musicians provided music for a square dance and for listening enjoyment.

Three large loads of wheat, that had been previously binded and stored in a barn, were threshed using 4 different threshers and were powered by steam engines and gas & oil tractors. The straw was baled by an Oliver Stationary hand wire tied bailer.

The saw mill was kept busy sawing a yard full of logs. Several different steam engines provided power to the saw mill. The day after the show, the logs that were left were finished up with a large Huber gas tractor.

The shingle mill was busy both days sawing shingles that were given away as souvenirs. Power was provided by a 6 H.P. Russell Portable and a ' scale Case 65 Model Steam Engine. The shingles were carried away as quickly as they were made.

The Power Eater Generator kept several of the steamers entertained. It provides work for both the steamer and the engineers!

Corn was ground into corn meal with a stone burr mill powered by a 16 H.P. Russell Engine. A gas engine powered the corn sheller. Corn meal was sold both days. Wheat and buckwheat flour were ground and sold on both days. A stone burr mill powered by a large gas engine ground the flour.

In gas engine alley, approximately 200 gas engines were popping away doing chores that they were built to do, such as grinding flour, pumping water, pumping an air compressor, generating electricity, etc.

A large display of antique cars came on Sunday to tour the show. Also two 'Swiss Chalets' house moving displays. They stirred up quite an interest and were a welcome addition to our show.

A Blue Grass Musical Group volunteered their talents on Sunday afternoon. They provided several hours of country music preceding the grand parade.

The grand parade featured all the rolling equipment on the grounds with a plaque awarded to each. The parade was led on Saturday by the Queen and the Thresherman of the Year riding in a Model T. Ton Truck owned by Ralph Jones of Woodsfield, Ohio. On Sunday the Queen and the Thresherman of the Year led the parade riding in a pony wagon and team owned by Harold Hatcher of Harrisville, Ohio.

List of machinery: 12 traction engines, 2 portable engines, 1 stationary boiler, 3 & scale traction engines, 5 table model steam & hot air engines, 32 oil & gas tractors, 1 model gas tractor, approximately 200 gas engines, 21 antique cars, 2 antique trucks, 5 threshers, 1 saw mill, 1 shingle mill, 2 stone burr mills and 1 power eater generator. Also other farm equipment to numerous to mention. A team of ponies and an ox & cart were the animal power at the show.

The officers & directors wish to thank all who helped in any way to put on the show and make it a success. Many gave numerous hours and talent getting this show together. For fear of missing somebody's name we will not mention any one individual.

We also want to thank the exhibitors who brought their equipment to our show, many at their own expense. Without exhibitors and equipment there could not be a show.

To those who attended our show, we thank you also. Without your support there would also not be a show. We hope to see you this year on September 10 and 11.