Port Huron Steam Engine

The long wait is over

port huron

Charles Hargreaves with his first steam engine - a 1920 Port Huron.

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Being a collector of old iron and being around steam engines as a kid, I've always wanted a steam engine, but things just did not work out right for years until I bought a 1920 Port Huron Steam Engine.

About the middle of July 1998, my oldest son called to tell me he had met a fellow that picked up scrap iron. The fellow said he knew where there were some items that my son might be interested in. He also told my son about a steam engine the other fellow had. My son looked the fellow up, and the man said he would sell the steam engine.

Being a charter member of the Western Michigan Old Engine Club, and with our show about two weeks away, I told my son to tell the fellow we would be down to see him right after the show. When we went to look at the engine and talked to the man, he said it had new flues put in the year before. The reason he was selling it was his son passed away suddenly, so he and his wife decided to part with it as he thought it was for the best. After visiting for a while, and coming to a price agreement, I put a down payment on it. On November 21, 1998, we paid him the rest and became the proud owners of a Port Huron steam engine. We loaded it and headed it to a new home. So now suddenly, so he and his wife decided to part with it as he thought it was for the best. After visiting for a while, and coming to a price the long wait is over.

The fellow said it was a 1920. It is a butt strap boiler. The name tag on the side of the cylinder reads, "Port Huron Long Fellow high pressure compound, Ser. No. 8532, Pat. Dates Sept. 11, 1888 April 3-Sept. 25-Oct. 16-Dec. 4 1900."