THE GOLDEN ROLL

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HERMAN OSWALT, 13654 Bandy Road, Alliance, Ohio 44601 -Died last July 28, 1974. Of all the books and magazines he read the Iron-Men Album was his favorite. He got where he didn't do much reading, but he would read and look at that book over and over. He would have attended all the steam engine doings no matter how far he would have to travel - if he had been able. When he was a young boy, he ran steam engines and he never lost his love for them. Submitted by Mrs. Herman Oswalt, 13654 Bandy Road, Alliance, Ohio 44601

ELMER R. LARSON, President of Western Minnesota Steam Threshers Reunion died May 12, 1975. Mr. Larsen died of a heart attack shortly after arriving at 'Steamer Hill' at Rollag, Minnesota. Larson was elected President of WMSTR in June 1967 and his knowledge in restoring old machiner and enthusiasm in promoting projects at Steamer Hill has brought many permanent attractions to the Annual Labor Day Show, considered one of the best in America. He was known throughout the nation for his knowledge of early day farm machinery, and his business firm in Fargo, North Dakota restored machines for several Midwest reunions. He was 59. He moved to the Fargo-Moorhead area in 1937 and worked at the Fargo Foundry until he started Larson Welding & Machine Co. Elmer Larson shall be greatly missed by all his fellow threshermen and family. Submitted by Mrs. Jim Briden, Route 1, Box 292, Fargo, North Dakota 58102.

D.R. 'DICK' BARTMUS died on March 6, 1975 at St. Elmo, Illinois. Dick was a charter member of the American Threshermen Association and held the title of Honorary Chairman for many years. He was a devoted member and was very active as long as his health permitted. He will be greatly missed by all his friends in the midwest. Submitted by George F. Bahre, Secretary, Coulterville, Illinois 62237.

ARTHUR H. WELLER, Pekin, Indiana passed away June 6, 1975, 99 years of age. He would have been 100  in August. Mr. Weller spent most of his life operating traction steam engine. He operated several makes of engines including a four-wheel drive Lansing engine. He was a subscriber to The Album for several years and enjoyed the pictures and articles. His and his wife's picture was in the Fall issue of 1948 for their 50th Wedding Anniversary. Submitted by Herbert H. Baker, Borden, Indiana 47106.

HENRY CHRISTGAU of Grand Meadow, Minnesota passed away May 21, 1975 at the age of 79. Krink was one of a vanishing breed of self-taught super machinists, who could build or repair any mechanism. He had a tri-state reputation for doing the jobs that other shops couldn't handle. In 1941 he built his first operating percision scale model of a steam traction engine, a 1/6 scale Case. When the steam hobby began spreading rapidly, he built two more beautiful 1/6 scale engines, an undermounted Avery and an Advance Rumely and did the percision work on another small undermounted Avery. In the late 50s and 60s he built three 1/2 scale percision models, giving due credit to some good help with the heavy work, as he was still open for business to machine men from everywhere. The three engines were Jesse McMiller's 1/2 scale Advance Rumely, his own 1/2 scale undermounted Avery, and James Sylling's 1/2 scale Case. Anyone of these engines will develop as much power as a two plow farm tractor. Courtesy of Durward Steinmetz, route 1, Box 120, La Farge, Wisconsin 54639

RUDOLPH C. SHINHOLT, 65, of Jonesboro, Indiana, died June 16, 1975. He was a long time subscriber to The Iron Men Album, and was truly a 'steam engine man'. The former Secretary of the Elwood Historical Club of Elwood Indiana, he was one of the first organizers of the show and a member of some 17 years.

At age 7, he had the honor of sitting at the dinner table of the adult engineers, a seldom seen sight, as women and children were second to eat meals. That morning he had completely operated his father's engine while threshing wheat. At age 15, he was operating one of the two rigs owned by his father, threshing many area crops. He and his father would compare the acres harvested each evening after supper. Rudolph often surpassed his father in the work, which greatly pleased him.

The former owner of both a 40 HP and a 65 HP Case Engine, a Case Separator, and a Water Wagon, he was very proud of the fact that his engines were always in running condition and painted as they had originally looked.

Rudolph C. Shinholt was a true ole time steamer, highly regarded for his knowledge of, and ability with, machinery both old and new. In his final tribute he was described as a master mechanic, and a true friend of many.

'Few men have walked God's highways so lightly, yet left such deep footprints'. Submitted by the family of Rudolph C. Shinholt, 5477 S 150 E, Jonesboro, Indiana.