THE STALKER PLOW

William Stalker

William Stalker The user

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Registrar, Manitoba Agricultural Museum, Inc., Box 10, Austin, Manitoba, Canada

During the Second World War, a truckload of scrap metal gathered in the Turtle Mountain area stopped briefly at a gas station in Boissevain, Manitoba. A passerby noticed an odd looking plow in the heap and was given permission to rescue it. Eventually, the plow found its way to the Manitoba Agricultural Museum at Austin, Manitoba, and the task was undertaken to discover its history. Following the barely readable inscription on the plow, a letter of inquiry was sent to the Penrith Chamber of Commerce in Penrith, England to see if they knew who could have made the plow. The inscription was 'Penrith.' The letter was forwarded to George Stalker, who is a partner with his son, Paul, in the five-generation Penrith firm of agricultural engineers and implement makers, Stalker Brothers in Castlegate. Mr. Stalker explained that the plow had been made by his great-grandfather, Jonathan Stalker - a horse-drawn double furrow plow -made in 1887. Jonathan Stalker's brother, William, had emigrated to America some time before, and on a holiday to England, he asked his brother to make the plow to his requirements as he had found no American or Canadian made plow to his liking. The plow was made, then dismantled and shipped to either Medicine Lodge or Kansas City. How the plow got from Kansas to the Turtle Mountain area is still a mystery. The 88 year old plow has been restored to its original colors and is now on display with hundreds of other pieces of agricultural equipment at the Manitoba Agricultural Museum.