Tractors
Tractor collections, antique farm toys, antique farm tractors, history of tractor manufacturers and more.

100 Years of Cletrac

Hart-Parr/Oliver collectors celebrate Cletrac centennial at a summer show in New York.

Ten-Hut! Massey Ferguson 40 Military Tractor

A 1972 Massey Ferguson 40 military tractor adds a unique flair to crawler collection.

Explore more articles that document the past and present of the antique tractor hobby:
Antique Farm Tractors
History of Tractor Manufacturers
Tractor Collections
Antique Farm Toys

Featured Product

Evolution of a Tractor

Evolution of a Tractor

Original reminiscences of IHC executives from April 1920. Includes factory photos not published elsewhere, plus manuscript and illustrations from collector Leroy Baumgardner Jr.

Featured Video

John Deere Balancing on Coke Bottles

Shopping

NEW LIFE FOR OLD IRON DVD

Hosted by Max Armstrong and featuring the International Harvester Co. 1915 Mogul and 1917 Titan tractors magnificently restored by C.H. Wendel and Mary Kelch. Other classic tractors include: 1940 Silver King R-38, 1958 John Deere 420V, 1940 Ferguson TO-20, 1958 Massey-Ferguson 35 Deluxe, 1953 Cockshutt 20, 1939 Farmall F-20, 1936 John Deere DI, 1954 Oliver 66 Diesel, 1940 Farmall H and Number 8 Little Genius Plow, 1958 Minneapolis-Moline 2 Star Crawler, 1962 Allis-Chalmers D-15, 1959 John Deere 630 and Model 227 Cornpicker, and a 1956 Case 400 High Clearance. In addition, this video has a feature segment on the Classic Tractors Calendar Club's 15th reunion at the Missouri River Valley Steam Engine Association's "Back to the Farm Reunion" in Boonville, Mo. 2004. Run time: 75 minutes.

$24.95

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO. CATALOGUE & BUYERS' GUIDE 1895

"Our mail order methods meet many wants," wrote a poetic but anonymous copywriter on a page of the 1895 Montgomery Ward & Co. catalogue. He had a gift for understatement. At its zenith from the 1880s to the 1940s, Montgomery Ward, like its cross-town Chicago rival, Sears, sold virtually everything the average American could think of or desire—and by mail. This was a revolution, and Ward's fired the first shot. To buy spittoons, books of gospel hymns, hat pins, rifles, wagons, violins, birdcages, or portable bathtubs, purchases that used to require many separate trips to specialist merchants, suddenly all the American shopper had to do was lick a stamp. This unabridged facsimile of the retail giant's 1895 catalogue showcases some 25,000 items, from the necessities of life (flour, shirts) to products whose time has passed (ear trumpets). It is an important resource for antiquaries, students of Americana, writers of historical fiction, and anyone who wants to know how much his great-grandfather paid for his suspenders. It is a true record of an era.

$17.95