Old Iron Questions

Identifying a Mystery Corn Sheller

sheller sheller

I enjoy the many fine articles about rare collectibles in Farm Collector. I especially enjoyed the article on the hand corn sheller in the May 2017 issue of Farm Collector. I spent much time as a young child shelling corn for the chickens on my father’s 160-acre farm.

Recently I acquired a John Deere Model No. 1B. On a trip to Minnesota’s North Shore Drive, we stopped at an architectural antique shop in Two Harbors. I was surprised to find an old wooden corn sheller tucked away in one corner. I asked the owner about it and he did not know any history about it or really care. That sheller was miles away from corn country and intrigued me so much that, a month later, I called the store, found that they still had it, and last weekend we drove 275 miles back there and bought it.

As the photo shows, all the joints in the wood framing were mortise and tenon. All joints were fastened with wood dowels. The lettering on the front reads: Manufactured for George Worthington & Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Lettering on the cob outlet reads No. 63; on the front casing, No. 69 and on the back casing, No. 39.

I called Jake Rens in Orange City, Iowa, recently and we discussed the sheller but he could not identify it either. I am wondering if any Farm Collector readers could identify the manufacturer, history and age of this sheller. An internet search turned up nothing. It would really ice the cake if I could find a crank for it.

Thanks for any help you can provide.

Bob Christensen, c/o The Gallery on 1st,
403 North 1st St., Montevideo, MN 56265;
(320) 269-5518 (work); (320) 226-1020 (cell);
email: galleryon1stmontevideo@hotmail.com.


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; fax: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Looking for Information on Stone Boats

boat 

Do any Farm Collector readers have information on a stone boat? No, it is not a rock group like Led Zeppelin. It was more like a heavy-duty sled or skid. It was pulled by a team and used to haul massive rocks from a tilled field. Made of heavy lumber, it was built low to the ground. I do not know if it was factory-built or homemade. If the former, all markings were long gone on the one I remember. I only saw it used once, but by my time, most fields were cleared of such debris. Perhaps I have missed something in earlier Farm Collector articles.

Clyde Eide, 3801 East Crest Dr.,Apt. 3205, Bryan, TX 77802


Editor’s note: There have been occasional references to stone boats in Farm Collector over the years, but none have been detailed. It seems most were made by farmers with wide variation in construction and design. Readers, have any information for Clyde?

Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

An Unusually Jolly Wheat Shocking Scene

harvest scene

A picture given to me by a friend in my hometown of Healy, Kansas, captures wheat shocking better than any picture I’ve seen – mostly because of its candid nature. The picture appears to have been contact-printed onto postcard stock. Genealogy friends have dated it, based on the postcard graphics, between 1907 and 1918. I believe the picture was taken at supper break. You can see a stand of wheat and shocks behind them, as well as a farm in the distance.

Questions arise: What was the joke? Where can I get a straw hat like those? Were they custom cutters? Does this relate at all to the cause of the Dust Bowl, when vast stands of native grass were turned to plant wheat?

Bob Foos, 701 Ellis St., Webb City, MO 64870; (417) 673-5835; bob.foos@gmail.com


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Looking for Leads on Grinder

grinder 

Does anyone recognize this grinder? A handle on the rear turns a series of gears to get speed out of the grinding rock that measures 1-3/4 inches wide and 5 inches in diameter (it could have been as wide as 6 inches when the rock was new). The overall height of the grinder in the “down” position is 7-1/2 inches. When you push down the handle coming out of the left side with your left hand, the grinding rock raises to 9-1/2 inches. I am grateful for any assistance.

Raymond Fenley,
email: RLF640@verizon.net; (940) 241-2700


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609; FAX: (785) 274-4385; email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com

Looking for Plans for Threshing Machine

  plans

I have built a 3/4-inch scale model of a 1904 steam tractor and am now looking for a set of plans for a threshing machine of approximately the same vintage. I am very willing to buy these if they are available. Can anyone help or direct me to a source for this information?


Bob Reimche, jbreimche@shaw.ca

Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609 FAX: (785) 274-4385 email: editor@farmcollector.com; online at: www.farmcollector.com