Field Notes


Readers Respond to 1893 Columbian Exposition

ferris-wheel

The debut of the ferris wheel in 1893

Sam Moore’s column (Farm Collector, June 2020) on the 1893 Columbian Exposition was very interesting. I would add the fact that the original Ferris wheel debuted there. I won this photo post card (above) at a family reunion in the 1990s.

Rick Borland, Carrollton, Ohio


Exposition’s legacy lives on in Kansas

I read Sam Moore’s column on the Columbian Exposition (Farm Collector, June 2020) with considerable interest. There is a close connection to the exposition here in Wamego, Kansas.

J.C. Rogers, a Wamego banker, visited the exposition and was thoroughly impressed. He vowed to create something of significance to cause the exposition to be remembered in Wamego. He returned to Chicago as the exposition closed and purchased artifacts to be brought to Wamego. Among the artifacts were a huge spread-winged eagle, about 20 12- by 12-foot classical paintings and two tall pillars.

Rogers had built a nice theater called the Columbian. Today, the huge eagle is at the peak of the restored theater’s roof. Six of the murals hang in the theater’s seating area, and the huge pillars add to the beauty of the facility. Another of the huge paintings hangs on the wall of the Kaw Valley Bank in Wamego, and the rest are housed in an air-conditioned vault.

The theater closed in the 1920s. About 25 years ago, a community group raised almost $2 million to restore the building. Now it has a beautiful performing arts theater and a gallery. The foundation that operates the building also operates the nearby Oz Museum, which is home to a

large collection of materials from the Wizard of Oz. Patrons can visit the building and gallery, or attend a theater presentation given by a local community theater group. The theater also presents the Wizard of Oz on stage annually during the Oz Fest.

Ronald J. Williams, Manhattan, Kansas


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609 • fax: (785) 274-4385 • email: editor@farmcollector.com • online at: www.farmcollector.com

Preserving the past in Pennsylvania

machinery

As an avid reader of Farm Collector, I would like to share some pictures and information about our collection of antiques and plain old farm tools, implements and even some machinery. We are in southeastern Pennsylvania and are the Concord Township Historical Society with a farm section titled “Farm Life.”

shelves

We are only able to open once a month due to shortage of people to man the exhibits. We do research on the origins of our township and its many beautiful farms, now turned into housing projects due to exploding growth around the Philadelphia area. Collections of deeds, pictures, documents, etc. create a look into the past all the way back to maps of the area by William Penn and his associates.

Albert Eelman, president,

Concord Township Historical Society


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609 • fax: (785) 274-4385 • email: editor@farmcollector.com • online at: www.farmcollector.com

 

Restored MH 20 is a tractor drive favorite

massey-harris

I’m not a Massey collector, but I do have the one my dad bought new in 1948 when I was 11 years old. It was fixed up so that it ran decent and looked good in 2006. Since then, it has been on about 5,000 miles of tractor drives. It has been the only Massey-Harris 20 on the WMT radio drive in eastern Iowa. It’s a good size for tractor drives and will scoot along up to 15mph if needed. I have been a subscriber since the beginning and still have all the issues.

Larry Cox, McGregor, Iowa


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609 • fax: (785) 274-4385 • email: editor@farmcollector.com • online at: www.farmcollector.com

A lifetime memory of a UDLX

tractor

I have a story I want to share with you. I’m extremely slow in responding to Bob Pripps’ article “One of a Kind” in the September 2018 issue of Farm Collector. In 1938, my family added a farm machinery dealership to their ranching operation. We started out with Minneapolis-Moline and later added J.I. Case, Massey-Harris, Packard cars and Jeeps.

Now, to my reason for writing. Bob mentioned that M-M zone managers would drive a UDLX to visit their dealers, but only on very rare occasions. We lived in Winner, South Dakota, and our zone headquarters was in Omaha. I was quite young at the time, but I distinctly remember when our zone manager drove into town in a UDLX. What an attraction in that small farming community! The only tractor we ever sold with a cab was an M-M Model R. Thank you for letting me share an old man’s memory with you.

Harry Jones,1336 2nd St., Brookings, S.D. 57006; hhjones@mchsi.com


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609 • fax: (785) 274-4385 • email: editor@farmcollector.com • online at: www.farmcollector.com

Model Maker’s Work Stands Out from the Rest

john-deere
Robert Stickel’s hand-crafted 1936 John Deere Model D tractor.

I have read your magazine almost from the beginning and have really enjoyed it and all the pieces you and your writers have done. However, “The Model Prisoner” in your April 2020 issue was over the top. I have always enjoyed seeing the skill of model makers, but Robert Stickel’s work is unbelievable.

To think of those models being made from paper, and in a prison cell, is just beyond belief. The pictures are so realistic you think you are looking at a picture of the real machine. I would love to see his models in person but the pictures are truly great. As I said, I have visited many truly great model makers over the years, but have not seen any whose work was as unique as Robert’s. Thank you for finding him and reporting on his work.

Jerry Wright, Trivoli, Illinois


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609 • fax: (785) 274-4385 • email: editor@farmcollector.com • online here

A Face Only a Mother Could Love

tractor 

In the May 2020 issue of Farm Collector is an article titled, “Going Head to Head.” In the article is a picture of a tractor that I have tried to forget: the International 7488. If there is ever a contest for the ugliest tractor, this tractor has to win. It may have power, but to describe it as really, really ugly is to pay it a compliment. 

Robert Wiseman via email


Send letters to: Farm Collector Editorial, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609 • fax: (785) 274-4385 • email: editor@farmcollector.com • online at: www.farmcollector.com







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