Red Power Round Up Features International Harvester

Red Power Round Up celebrates International Harvester with comprehensive museum display.

| September 2014

  • A 1953 Farmall Cub restored by Larry Matalas, Kenosha, Wis., was a people magnet at the RPRU. Over the course of 20 years, Larry has draped the tractor in stainless steel bling. A machinist, Larry made or repurposed all of the tractor's unique additions, from the distributor base to the dual exhaust and carburetor to the air cleaner (recycled dog dish) to the fan assembly and air cleaner.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A 55W baler owned by Don and Kirstie Olson, Ham Lake, Minn. and powered by the Electrall system.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • Howard Raymond spearheaded the museum and dealership displays at the Red Power Round Up.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • This "new in the box" neon refrigeration sign is owned by Oran Sorenson, Garretsen, S.D.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A 1915 Titan 10 hp stationary gas engine owned by Steve Fett, Lennox, S.D. The engine was originally sold by International Harvester Co., Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A dealer display for the Electrall system.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • Larry Matalas.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • "Every time you look at it, you'll see something different," Larry says of his one-of-a-kind Cub. He handcrafted the tractor's grille and even used pieces from two IHC string ties to create a custom medallion at the grille's base.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • 1954 Super M diesel with torque amplifier and tractor-mounted Electrall system owned by Don and Kirstie Olson, Ham Lake, Minn.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • Willard Ottman, Lemmon, S.D., has strong ties to this 1928 IHC reaper. His grandfather bought it new to harvest alfalfa seed. "If you put alfalfa through a binder," he explains, "it’d knock the seed loose. But the reaper was real gentle on it." Pulled by two horses, the reaper cut the grain and placed it on the ground in a sheaf (or gavel) that was tied by hand (often by the youngest member of the farm family) using a piece of straw. "It’s a lost art," Willard says.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • Willard Ottman.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A 1948 Farmall Cub owned by Gary Steffen hitched to a bluegrass stripper owned by Dale Steffen, White Lake, S.D.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • 1956 101 combine owned by Dennis and Bryon Hendricks, Estalline, S.D.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • This 1968 International 4100 is owned by Kyle Gaikowski, Clark, S.D.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A McCormick-Deering F-30 Cane tractor, owned by Gerald Fischer, Hartington, S.D.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A trio of pedal tractors reflected in an overhead mirror.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A 1964 International C900 truck owned by Rick Howard, Blunt, S.D.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A beautiful vintage sign for O'Keefe Implement in the dealership displays.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A 1922 15-30 Titan kerosene tractor owned by the Sweeter family, Lennox, S.D.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus
  • A 1952 International L130 truck with SD-200 engine owned by Doug Godfrey, Hitchcock, S.D.
    Photo by Leslie C. McManus

In the old iron hobby, the Red Power Round Up is known for being the biggest traveling show in the U.S. The 2014 show, held in Huron, South Dakota, added an asterisk to that record when South Dakota Chapter 21 unveiled what was surely the biggest temporary museum ever.

Occupying a 96,000-square-foot cattle pavilion at the South Dakota State Fairgrounds, the museum did banner business … for about 72 hours. “We moved in the first tractor Sunday afternoon (before the show opened on Thursday),” says Show Chairman Steve Masat, Redfield, South Dakota, “and we finished putting it together three days later. Nothing like this has been done before, and we did it here, in South Dakota.”

Displays in the museum — tractors, implements, equipment and much more — showcased the evolution of International Harvester landmarks of the past century. A smaller but equally beefy exhibit in the same building presented six decades of dealership displays from the early 1900s through the 1960s. It was, as one visitor noted, like visiting a Smithsonian museum.

“We had a lot of help from a lot of people,” says Howard Raymond, Wellfleet, Nebraska, who chaired the undertaking. “But when some of the things that had been promised didn’t show up, we went out to the tractor display area and started ‘shopping.’”



Because of the museum’s artful yet compact layout, those who agreed to contribute an item to the display gave up the opportunity to participate in the daily parade at the Round Up: Once a piece was placed, removing it — even for a short time — would have been highly problematic. But 99 percent of those asked didn’t hesitate before agreeing, Steve says. “Several said they were honored to be invited,” he says.

Reaper was the key

“We wanted to tell the history of this company,” Howard says, “and show the diversity of the products International Harvester produced. But we also wanted to highlight the innovative ideas that came out of International Harvester.



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