Built in Canada: Western Canada Farm Progress Show Antique Truck and Tractor Display

The Western Canada Farm Progress Show in Regina, Saskatchewan, impresses with their Antique Truck and Tractor Display.

| November 2010

  • Barry Olson with his 1941 Case V. The Model V was built from 1939 to 1955; an industrial model (the VI) was also offered.
    Barry Olson with his 1941 Case V. The Model V was built from 1939 to 1955; an industrial model (the VI) was also offered.
  • A parade of handsomely restored antique trucks is a highlight of the Farm Progress Show in Regina.
    A parade of handsomely restored antique trucks is a highlight of the Farm Progress Show in Regina. 
  • Howard McDougall with a 1951 Cockshutt 40. The Model was built from 1949 to 1957.
    Howard McDougall with a 1951 Cockshutt 40. The Model was built from 1949 to 1957.
  • Andrew McDougall with a 1949 Cockshutt 30. The Model 30 was produced from 1946 to 1956. It was sold in the U.S. as the Co-op Model 30 and Farmcrest Model 30.
    Andrew McDougall with a 1949 Cockshutt 30. The Model 30 was produced from 1946 to 1956. It was sold in the U.S. as the Co-op Model 30 and Farmcrest Model 30.
  • Henry Boutin with his 1935 Massey Harris four-wheel drive GP. The model was produced for just six years, starting in 1930.
    Henry Boutin with his 1935 Massey Harris four-wheel drive GP. The model was produced for just six years, starting in 1930.
  • Darryl McDougall with a 1954 Cockshutt 50. Sold in the U.S. as the Co-op Model E-5, the Model 50 was manufactured from 1952 to 1957.
    Darryl McDougall with a 1954 Cockshutt 50. Sold in the U.S. as the Co-op Model E-5, the Model 50 was manufactured from 1952 to 1957.
  • Among the vintage truck displays was this 1927 Chevrolet truck owned by Audry and Wilbert Wilson, McCord, Saskatchewan.
    Among the vintage truck displays was this 1927 Chevrolet truck owned by Audry and Wilbert Wilson, McCord, Saskatchewan.

  • Barry Olson with his 1941 Case V. The Model V was built from 1939 to 1955; an industrial model (the VI) was also offered.
  • A parade of handsomely restored antique trucks is a highlight of the Farm Progress Show in Regina.
  • Howard McDougall with a 1951 Cockshutt 40. The Model was built from 1949 to 1957.
  • Andrew McDougall with a 1949 Cockshutt 30. The Model 30 was produced from 1946 to 1956. It was sold in the U.S. as the Co-op Model 30 and Farmcrest Model 30.
  • Henry Boutin with his 1935 Massey Harris four-wheel drive GP. The model was produced for just six years, starting in 1930.
  • Darryl McDougall with a 1954 Cockshutt 50. Sold in the U.S. as the Co-op Model E-5, the Model 50 was manufactured from 1952 to 1957.
  • Among the vintage truck displays was this 1927 Chevrolet truck owned by Audry and Wilbert Wilson, McCord, Saskatchewan.

At the Antique Truck & Tractor Display at the Western Canada Farm Progress Show, some visitors strolled around the building, glanced at the various pieces of machinery, perhaps stopped for a moment to watch one being fired up and then, just as quickly, moved on to another part of the show. Some people just don’t appreciate old tractors, even when they’ve been rebuilt and repainted.
But there are those who know the true relevance of these machines to the current technology on display nearby. They know that these pieces from the past laid the groundwork for the giants of today. They also know that each of the pieces on display comes with a proud owner and a good story behind it. The tales that emerge are many and varied, and most of them speak to the pioneer spirit that helped settle the Canadian west in the first half of the 20th century.

As one collector put it, “Tractors made this part of the world.”

Judging by the volume of antique trucks, tractors and other machinery at the show, there was no lack of choice for early consumers: Cockshutt, Massey-Harris, Case, John Deere, Oliver and Minneapolis-Moline were among the brands on display. The building where the antiques were showcased was full of old-time color, sound and activity on a daily basis.

And it wasn’t limited to trucks and tractors. One could also find the occasional threshing machine, hay rack or combine, depending on what had been recently recovered or restored. There was even a blacksmith hard at work in a corner. About 100 pieces make up each year’s display, meaning people who want to see a unique blend of technology and history have plenty to choose from, all in one place.



Blending technology and history

For more than three decades, the Western Canada Farm Progress Show – the largest dry land farm technology show in Canada – has been at the forefront of advances in agricultural technology trends. Recognized as Canada’s National Farm Show, the three-day event – held annually in June in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada – is consistently ranked number one among farm shows for its relevance to exhibitors and the agriculture industry.

Attracting more than 40,000 people annually, the internationally-recognized event is the place to be for opportunity and innovation. Many manufacturers launch product releases to coincide with the show, guaranteeing that the new offering will be seen by buyers and sellers from around the world. But many visitors come just to see the Antique Truck & Tractor Display.