J.I. Case Leaves a Giant’s Legacy


| 5/8/2017 11:11:00 AM


Tags: June 2017, First Things, Leslie C. McManus,
Leslie C. McManus

In this issue of Farm Collector, historian and columnist Sam Moore takes a close look at J.I. Case, the founder of the J.I. Case Threshing Machine Co. This year marks the 175th anniversary of its founding: What better time to revisit the life of a legendary American industrialist?

A self-made man, Case was a compelling figure in American history. His business success alone is a fascinating story of uncommon enterprise. When, for instance, hard cold cash was unavailable, Case accepted customer payments in the forms of animals, supplies and land. Both a patriot and an astute marketer, he adopted the eagle as the symbol of his company in 1865. He was a man of larger than life passions, engaged in breeding racehorses, early auto racing and Great Lakes shipping ventures.

In his column, Sam shares a couple of anecdotes that go a long way toward illustrating what kind of man Case was. I’ll not repeat them here – you’ll enjoy reading Sam’s column – but they show a man of great integrity. He had immense confidence in the quality of his company’s product and did not hesitate to back that up with a level of personal involvement exceptional in any era.

Still, more than a century after his death, it is impossible to truly know the man and his motivations. Was Case a man of exemplary ideals, or one who had such complete confidence in his products that he refused to accept the possibility of failure until presented with evidence to the contrary?

 Whether his focus was on satisfying the customer or simply proving that he was right, the end result was an uncommon emphasis on quality. Either way, the farmer won, and it is that legacy that Case enthusiasts throughout the world celebrate this year.

More than a century after his death in 1891, Case remains a giant among manufacturers of American farm equipment. His mark on the evolution of mechanized farm equipment is a lasting one, and a cherished chapter of Americana. We shall not see his like again. FC