Impressive Restoration of Industrial Weight Trucks

Two International industrial weight trucks restored to original glory

| October 1998

  • Lawrence with the model 61 with wrecker.
    Lawrence with the model 61 with wrecker.
    Photo by G. Wayne Walker Jr.
  • The restored model 63, and another project: a 1918 Buick Racer.
    The restored model 63, and another project: a 1918 Buick Racer.
    Photo by G. Wayne Walker Jr.
  • The model 61, before Lawrence got hold of it.
    The model 61, before Lawrence got hold of it.
    Photo by Lawrence Herrs
  • The model 63 just after Lawrence got it home
    This shot of the model 63 was taken just after Lawrence got it home. He has a different mag ready for the truck, and installed it first thing. The engine was not stuck when he got the truck.
    Photo by Lawrence Herrs
  • The oak cab of the model 63 was completely rebuilt.
    The oak cab of the model 63 was completely rebuilt.
    Photo by Lawrence Herrs

  • Lawrence with the model 61 with wrecker.
  • The restored model 63, and another project: a 1918 Buick Racer.
  • The model 61, before Lawrence got hold of it.
  • The model 63 just after Lawrence got it home
  • The oak cab of the model 63 was completely rebuilt.

Tractors weren't the only workhorses manufactured for farm use in the early years of this century: Industrial weight trucks, for use on the farm and in industrial settings, also rumbled across the landscape. Two classic examples have been restored by Lawrence Herrs, Washington, Kan. 

Lawrence's projects include two Internationals: a 3-ton model 63 flat bed, and a 2-ton model 61 wrecker. The 63 was produced from 1924-27 (his is a '25); the 61 from 1915-23 (his is a '21). Despite their age, and years of deterioration, the trucks were built to last, he said.

"They were made so heavy that they are just about indestructible," he said. "Most of them were sold to the logging and mining industry, and they're really heavy. The top speed on the 63 is 15 miles an hour, so they could gear down for heavy loads, and climp steep hills."

Lawrence grew up on International equipment.



"I was raised on a farm, and we always had Internationals," he said. "After I got back from the Army, I was a mechanic and shop foreman for an International dealer for 17 years."

Since 1978, he's been in business for himself at Herrs Machine, rebuilding hydrostat transmissions, large diesel engines and pumps, and turbochargers for all brands of farm equipment.