110 Case Engine Restoration and Other Engines

A reader shares memories of his interactions with Harold Ottaway, owner of a 110 Case engine, and photos of other assorted steam traction engines.


| March 2005



50-bottom plowing demonstration

June 28, 2003 at the National Threshers Reunion in Wauseon, OH. Spectators are crowded around the 25 HP, 30 HP, and 36 HP Rumely engines that have just finished plowing with a 50-bottom John Deere plow.

Kevin Small

Reader Kevin Small of Portersville, PA chimes in again this issue, sending along memories of Harold Ottaway inspired by Chady Atteberry's article Steam Traction Engine Shows at Joyland Park in the March/April 2004 issue. Kevin writes:

I really enjoyed Chady Atteberry's article on Harold Ottaway and the Joyland Park shows in the March/April 2004 Steam Traction. I would like to add a little history about the 110 HP Case that Harold owned.  

I wrote a letter to Harold on a cold winter day in 1988 asking him about the early shows at Joyland and the 110 Case. A month or so later, Harold replied with a nice letter and some photos.

Harold bought the Case engine from H.M. Jones of Little Falls, Minn., in 1952. Jones did not own the 110, but he had the authority to sell it. Jones also owned a road-building company. He had a 110 boiler mounted on truck wheels that he moved from job to job to heat road oil.

This 1912 110 HP Case, no. 28654, sat at Mildred, MN, which was a small community just north of Pine River, MN. The 110 was last used on a sawmill. The mill was pretty well rotted out, but the engine was nice and fairly complete.

Harold wrote a letter to the Case company in 1952 and got a short history on the engine. This 110 was originally shipped to the Case branch house in Minot, ND in 1912. Jones told Harold that around 1944, his friend had bought the engine in the Minot area and had it shipped on a railroad flatcar to Mildred, MN. Jones also said they had a 24-inch brush plow that would plow under small trees up to 4 inches in diameter and the 110 pulled this plow at various times. Harold saw the plow in 1952, but he did not buy it. Harold then hauled the 110 home to Wichita, KS using the two trucks.