1971 Show Report of Antique Acres, Cedar Falls, Iowa

MY VIEWPOINT OF MEN & MACHINES OF YESTERYEAR


| January/February 1972



Iowa on parade

Iowa on parade at Antique Acres, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 18-55 Wood Bros. Steamer built at Des Moines, Iowa operated by Robert Fischels, owned by A. J. Fischels and Sons. Courtesy of A. J. Fischels, Waterloo, Iowa 50700.

A. J. Fischels

Resident of Antique Acres, U. S. Hwy. 218, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50613.

Being a resident of Antique Acres, I have the advantage of viewing the action on a yearly basis, not just during Labor Day Weekend.

My first glimpse of a steam engine was the summer we moved to the Acres, seven years ago. Being a farm girl and a tomboy at heart, three years of city-living was enough for me. I was anxious to retreat to the wide open spaces. I'll admit, though, my first visit to the Acres left me with second thoughts. It was the first year at this location and it's hard to imagine, looking at the beautiful lawns and shade trees in the camping and picnic areas now, that it was nothing but a tangled mess of brambles and waist high weeds. The members really put in a hard summer's work; and I watched in amazement as the huge strange looking machines started pouring in.

My first show left me in awe, but as I became busy with my own daily routine after venturing into parent-hood, the shows came to mean little more than a lot of noise and polluted air.

Then last year, I had my first experience helping Andy Fischels, Vice-Pres. of Antique Acres, with his stories. It started out with just the typing and then after a few stories I 'advanced', writing the stories around his notes. When we were working on our last one last winter, he said, 'Pat, next year you're not only going to help write them, you're going to 'know' what you're writing about.'

Well, he kept his word and it's been quite an experience, plus a lot of fun. The 10th of July a 'Threshing Day' was scheduled and Andy informed me I was about to make my debut into the movie-world. So I donned a calico skirt and bonnet and ventured out across the fields. The stage was set with John Sundermeyer engineering the A. J. Fischels and Sons' Wood Bros. Steamer and Andy operating John's Wood Bros. Separator, making this a complete Wood Bros. rig which is an Iowa product, built in Des Moines, Iowa. Also present was a host of members giving a helping hand wherever needed. As I paraded around under Andy's directions, getting dust in my hair and soot on my blouse, the tom-boy in me started to take hold and I was about to climb on the hay rack and start pitching bundles, when the thresher resisted the sideways bundles it was being tossed. So I decided to remain a lady and let the men create their own problems. After a brief intermission, they were back in business and threshed seven loads of rye. The rest was carefully stacked to wait until show time.