A CASE of Love?


| September/October 1975



Case steam traction engine

This is my 1902, 20-60 HP J. I. Case steam traction engine and some information on it. On left of picture show the engine about a week after we haled it in. I got it at my brother's farm South of Lengby, Minnesota. That's me, the proud owner and licensed

Gary A

Route 1, Lengby, Minnesota 56651.

To start with, I'm 23 years old (a young engineer). I purchased the engine in February 1973 from Al Johnson of Leonard, Minnesota who had the engine on a sawmill for a number of years and sometime in the '60s he cleaned and painted the steamer, had it in a Fair at Bagley, Minnesota on a John Deere threshing machine. Then it sat at Clear-brook for awhile at some 'doings' and then it came back to his farm where it sat by a shed until I purchased it.

I don't know the engine number as of yet, but the boiler number is 8642. I've found a good way to get the governor real senseitive on a steam engine - at least, it sure made the governor sharp on my engine. What I did was set the speeder wheel so the balls on the governor fly way out, as far as possible, and just enough tension on the speeder spring to lift the valve up. The Judson governor on my engine is so sensitive that if you spit on the flywheel when it's running, you'd hear it let out a chug or two out the stack. After Richard and I got the speed on the engine set at 250 R.P.M. he held the tachometer on the crankshaft and I took a plank and put between the flywheel and drive wheel and pulled as hard as I could and the engine dropped approximately 10 R.P.M. before the governor opened a little and gained its speed back. I don't think you can get a governor much more senseitive than that.

Richard and I are planning on making a few more changes on the engine this coming spring. We are going to make a set of Contractor's Fuel Bunker for it and a canopy and sand black it, prime it, paint it and put the famous Case decals on it -Should look real pretty then! F-74

This is my oldest brother, Richard and his son, Darren, on the steamer getting ready to take off for another run around the field. You'll notice the engine doesn't have the original b inkers on the back. Al Johnson told me that the original were taken off before he bought it in 1952 because it was on a sawmill up by Turtle River which is a little ways away from Bemidji, Minnesota that was so they could fire it from the ground and I guess he had other uses for the bunkers as he cut it up and used it for something else.