ARCHIVES: Threshing Season in Gnadenhutten


| July/August 1998



# Picture 01

John Steel, 2705 Steel Rd. NW, Dover, Ohio 44622, writes, 'I ran across this old photo in our local newspaper, the New Philadelphia Times-Reporter, dated Sunday, December 7, 1997, and thought of the Album right away. This photo and story was taken some ten-twelve miles from my home here in the County of Tuscarawas, Ohio. I have tried to make an educated guess as to what make of engine and separator but can't come up with anything. In my opinion it possibly resembles a Cooper. I invite your input. Anyway, the picture captures the work that went into making us the best fed nation in the world. Keep the fire hot, lots of steam makes the work easier!'

The year 1901 in Tuscarawas County history could be called somewhat of a chaotic 12 months by the casual historical observer.

That was the year of the record April snowfall which started April 18 and dropped more than three feet of snow in four days on the county. Building roofs collapsed, sheds were flattened, trains were stalled, farm houses were isolated for days, electrical and mail service stopped and street lights went out. The snow did melt rather rapidly, and of course, local flooding occurred.

In July a single lightning flash killed a grandmother, her daughter, and two children, causing historian Henry Haglock to say it was the worst lightning bolt in county history.

A steel strike in September resulted in one man killed, another wounded in Dover riots. There was a widespread smallpox epidemic in the county resulting in deaths, but this also led to the first mandated vaccinations in the area.

President William McKinley died after being shot in Buffalo, and it was said hundreds from the county witnessed his funeral procession in Canton.