Atomic Power

LAWLER STEAM OPERATED PUMPING AND BOTTOM HOLE HEATING EQUIPMENT FOR OIL WELLS


| November/December 1962



Natural gas fired application

This picture was taken at Oil Dale, Calif. A No. 100 model high pressure natural gas fired application. This well was increased from 3 barrels to 9 barrels per day, 12 gravity, at a cost of 1.47 per 24 hours.

HOT WATER CIRCULATION METHOD

The most commonly used method of bottom hole heating is the circulation of hot water through a heat exchange system. This involves heating water by the use of circulating coils or conventional low pressure steam boiler equipment with its relatively inefficient use of fuel and the need for a power and pumping unit for circulation.

This method, although having some merit at shallow depths is expensive on operation and limited in application because of the inability to provide adequate temperatures at lower depths.

ELECTRICAL HEATING

The application of heat by the use of electricity also has been tried extensively and found useful to a limited extent in some situations, but because of the cost of operation and secondary problems of cable maintenance it has not proven to be a satisfactory answer under the conditions of pressure, chemical action, depth, and other conditions found in these problem wells.

THE LAWLER SYSTEM OF BOTTOM HOLE HEATING

The Lawler system of bottom hole heating uses high pressure, high temperature steam as a source of heat and utilizes simple principles of physics to obtain the transfer and application of required temperatures at depth.

The system not only solves the problems of heating of wells effectively but does so with a high degree of operating economy as well.

This fact of operating economy takes on added significance when it is noted that the cost of recovery has in many cases of well stimulation by electrical heating or circulation of hot water been greater than the value of the added production obtained.