CANADIAN NOTES

THE ''JOSEPH HALL'' MACHINERY


| January/February 1953


Goderich, Ontario, Can.

When questioning oldtimers about their early threshing recollections I have often heard this 'The first threshing machine I remember was made in Oshawa' and coupled with this statement would be 'And what a heavy brute it was!' These old unmounted threshers were well and solidly built and their owners continued to use them long after the mounted machines came on the market. Loading and unloading these old threshers and the down horse-powers into and out of the high wheeled wagons then in use is remembered as the hardest part of threshing.

The history of these Oshawa threshing machines date back to 1828 when Joseph Hall, a native of New Jersey, built a small thresher. His machine was considered quite a good one and he decided to begin the manufacture of threshers at Rochester, New York. Halls threshers were of the open cylinder type and received favorable mention during the 1830's. Early in 1840 John A. Pitts, who with his brother Hiram A., of Winthrop, Maine, had invented the 'endless apron' separator in 1837, came to Rochester and joined up with Joseph Hall. Together they built threshers of the Pitts type for two or three years and during this time the original Pitts machine was improved by extending the tailings elevator to deliver the tailings into the cylinder instead of on the apron. This improvement Hall patented in his own name and the resulting dissatisfaction broke up the partnership.

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THE MOST PERFECT THRESHER, THE MOST PERFECT SEPARATOR, THE MOST PERFECT CLEANER EVER OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC. THE ONLY TRUE GRAIN SAVER

Joseph Hall continued to manufacture several hundred machines a year in his Rochester factory while John A. Pitts moved on to Springfield, Ohio, and then to Buffalo, New York, where he founded the big Buffalo-Pitts Company. Meanwhile the territory north of Lake Ontario was rapidly becoming settled and as the brush was cleared and the farms grew bigger a demand was created for threshing machines. The only place to procure these was south across the lake and with Rochester having direct shipping connections it was only natural that Joseph Hall got the bulk of the orders. His export trade grew so extensive that he decided to explore the possibility if starting a branch factory in Canada and thus supply the market more cheaply by eluding the customs duty.






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