Case for The Corn Husker and Silo Filler


| September/October 1960


In due time the new cutter head and the parts for the husker came and were installed. Everything worked out fine. We covered the shaker with light sheet steel so that everything except the good ears would go through into the blower, the shelled corn cleaning fan and bagger were not needed. The blower pipe was reduced from 10 inches to 8 inches by tapered joint at the blower, and 8 inches on into the silo, in order to give more wind velocity, necessary to blow the fodder over the top into the silo.

The only trouble this ever caused was when a stray cornstalk would get lodged in the pipe, and this did not happen often.

The Illinois College of Agriculture had run some tests on dry fodder silage so we got their advice which, in a nut shell, was to use a pound of water to a pound of fodder. The resulting silage was better than dry fodder but not as good as regular silage.

We used a ' garden hose under 40 lb. pressure from our water system to deliver the water into the top elbow and on into the funnel, which was mounted big end down, bell effect; keeping all water out of the riser pipe. By an attached rope we kept the funnel delivering to the center of the silo. Under this set-up you can husk corn as soon as the ears are ready to crib and as long as you can get in and out of the field. No waiting for the fodder to dry!

We never allowed the silo to seal, but started feeding as much as the cows and livestock would clean up. We had all the feed we could handle.

We followed this method until the late 20's when we went over to green corn silage which we found better for increased milk production.