DAUGHTERS FOLLOW DAD'S FOOTSTEPS IN STEAM

HOW WE GOT THIS STORY


| May/June 1981



Joyce and Annie

Joyce, left, and Annie on cleanup detail.

This article, about two beautiful steam persons who make great 'cover girls' with the family Reeves, started with a photo essay about Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, by Paul W. Holton, 10022 Marnice Avenue, Tujunga, California 91042 (IMA. Jan.-Feb. 1981).
Anne was in one of the photos, unidentified. We wrote to Lennis Moore, administrator of the Midwest Old Settlers and Threshing, who provided names. Then we wrote to Lyle, and the family cooperated with comments and pictures.
The Hoffmasters typify all that is best in the American family. We know there are many other parents, children and grandchildren who find pleasure and grow together, through the engine hobbies.Gerry Lestz

Lyle Hoffmaster, of Bucyrus, Ohio, has the great satisfaction of knowing that his two lovely daughters, Anne and Joyce, find just as much joy in the family Reeves steam traction engine as he does.

Lyle bought the engine in 1951, and found that the girls were interested in it from the time they were toddlers.

IMA asked Lyle and the girls to tell the story, and they have responded like thoroughbreds. Lyle is an oldtimer; he recalls Rev. Elmer Ritzman, founder of IMA, from visits to rallies.

The engine itself is a Reeves double simple built in 1906; number 3547. Nothing is known of its early history until it was shipped into Monroe County, Illinois, in 1917.

It was used in the Waterloo area for the next 15 years. It sawed, graded roads, pressed cider, threshed and filled silos until 1932 when the boiler was considered unsafe.