DAYS OF YORE


| May/June 1966



Aultman & Taylor engine

Courtesy of John J. Uhlenkott, E. 315 Nebraska Ave., Spokane, Wash. 99207 Photo of logging operation using a 20 H.P. Aultman & Taylor return flue compound engine.

John J. Uhlenkott

E.315 Nebraska St., Spokane, Washington 99207

I think it is in order to write a few lines of my past life and experiences as a steam engineer.

My father was a saw-mill and shingle-mill operator in Idaho. These were stationary operations. In the shingle-mill I took shingles away as they dropped from the saw and stacked them up in piles ready for the baler. This mill was powered by a 20 H.P. Westinghouse double cylinder single-acting stationary engine.

Then in 1904, Dad bought a sawmill. It was powered by a 10' x 16' Atlas stationary engine. I used to start and stop the engine when we were running the planer. I also fired the boiler. As I wasn't strong enough to handle a scoop, my Dad furnished me with a smaller shovel and I kept up steam.

Meanwhile there were steam threshing rigs in the area. I took enough interest in them that I could tell by the looks of the steam engine tracks what make of an engine had moved by. One instance I remember very clearly. The weather was bad. There was some snow on the ground and the rest was mud. This man had a 20 H.P. Aultman & Taylor return flue Compound engine and was taking it to his saw-mill. He had taken the front wheels off and had chained a single-bob logging sleigh under the front end. He had 20 head of horses hooked up to it and had a full head of steam on the engine, using all the power it had. This engine is now owned by the late Chris Busch's family at Colton, Washington. However, in 1916, my Dad bought this engine and we threshed with it and I did some logging with it. I am enclosing a photo of this logging operation.

In 1918 I was drafted into the Army and served for the duration in the 54th Artillery. Then after the war more logging with the old Aultman & Taylor.