FIFTY YEARS OF THRESHING


| January/February 1968



25 Waterloo engine

Courtesy of Thos. W. Lobb, Helston, Manitoba, Canada. My 25 Waterloo moving a house in 1940. I am standing on the tank, with my back to the flywheel, with my fireman, Walter Mayors, standing inside the front wheel. My brother, Grover, who is now gone, is

Thos. W. Lobb

Helston, Manitoba, Canada

I have read with pleasure the Iron-Man Album for eleven years, from cover to cover and surely enjoy seeing photos of steamers.

A large number of makes that I have seen in your ALBUM were not sold in Canada. The most popular makes sold and used in our part of the country were Case, Robert Bell, Nichols & Shepherd, George White, Waterloo, American Abell, Aultman Taylor, sawyer Massey and a few others. It seemed to me in this area,

where I was born, and still live that the Case machinery was the most prominent.

My father and his partner got their first outfit in 1902. It was a Stevens Turner and Burns portable 19 HP. and a Goodison separator less feeder and blower. After a few years they added a Hawk-eye feeder to the separator and traded in the portable for a 20 Hp. traction.

I can remember a few odd things about the old portable, such as three fire holes, one on each side, to fire with straw and a large door at the rear for the use of wood. I was told the large door at the rear was to allow roots and trash to be easily thrown in. There also was no throttle lever on the portable and the engineer had to climb up and open the main valve on the steam line to operate it. A few years later, a Neepawa wind-stacker was used to replace the straw carrier. These windstackers were manufactured in Neepawa, Manitoba, a small town about twenty miles from where we live. They were highly recommended by everyone that used them and hundreds of them were sold in the 1900's. Around 1912 new separators came out with windstackers on them, so this company went out of business.