Frick Company & Stanley Brothers


| May/June 1992



Steam traction engine

Jack Norbeck

Norbeck Research 117 Ruch St. Coplay, PA 18037

Frick 50 HP steam traction engine, built in 1919 by the Frick Co., of Waynesboro, Pa., owner Ray Herr, Paradise, Pa.; 1918 Stanley steam car 20 HP, built by the Stanley brothers, Newton, Mass., owner Marvin Klair of Wilmington, Delaware.

Photo is by Jack Norbeck at Rough and Tumble in Kinzers, Pa.

George Frick, who established the Frick Company, was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania on a 500 acre farm purchased in 1733 by his great-great-grandfather from the Penns. George's grandfather, Abraham Frick, was a captain in the Revolution.

When George Frick was nine years old, his father left the home of his Swiss ancestors in Lancaster County and moved the family to the Cumberland Valley, near Quincy, Pa.

In 1848, George Frick began manufacturing grain cleaners and horse powers in a weaving mill at Quincy. There, two years later, he constructed his first steam engine. This was mounted on a wooden frame and delivered two horsepower. In 1851 or 1852 he built a shop on a farm near Ringgold and in 1853, established the Frick Company. George Frick became a pioneer builder for four essential kinds of equipment: steam engines, grain threshers, sawmills and refrigerating systems. Frick sawmills, introduced in 1875, were later built in quantities up to a thousand or more a year. Frick refrigerating, air conditioning, ice making and quick-freezing systems have set the standards of dependability since 1882.