Frick Double Cylinder Steam Engine

Are There Any Frick 8x10 Double Cylinder Steam Engines Still in Existence?


| July/August 2000



12025 Steven Avenue, Smithsburg, Maryland 21783

My friends and I have talked over the years about the big Frick 8 x 10 double cylinder steam engine. We have heard stories about the engines, but have never been able to find if any are still around. Here is some of what was said:

These letters come from the Frick Engine Club Bulletins 

What is the truth about the Frick 8 x 10 D. C. T.?

In order to compete with the big engines in the West, Frick came out with an 8 x 10 double cylinder traction engine in 1911. This engine had 24" drive wheels and 12" front wheels. Some people close to the factory I have talked with claim there were six of these engines made, and all shipped to the same place in the Midwest. Searchers of the Frick records up to 1916 do not confirm these claims. I have only found the record of two engines. These two 8 x 10 DCT engines were built in 1909. Engine #13797 was shipped November 22, 1911, to Cooper Machinery Company in St. Louis, Missouri. The second engine #14009 was shipped November 19, 1913, to Dukehart Machinery, Smyrna, Nebraska, and some two years after it was built. Frick listed the 8x10 UCT in their 1911, 1912 and 1913 price lists, but did not list it in their 1914 price list. This would seem to indicate that the 8 x 10 DCT wasn't a howling success and was dropped after these two engines were made and shipped.

From a different bulletin 

Bill Strayer goes on to say that in the early fifties he met a Mr. J. D. Roberts, of McLean, Illinois, at an engine show in northwestern Ohio. During their conversation, he learned that Roberts had worked at the Frick branch in Illinois, so he asked him about the big engines. Mr. Roberts was surprised that Bill knew anything about these big engines and went on to say that he had personally unloaded four of these big engines from rail cars at the Illinois branch. Mr. Roberts further said that the freight cost from Pennsylvania to the west kept Frick from being competitive with the western made engines.