Headers


| May/June 1963



Belleville, Penna.

On page 18 of the March-April issue of the Album there were several letters about Headers that brought to my mind the year of 1914 when I worked on the Newton Ranch, about 4 miles east of Fallon, Montana.

We had about 200 acres of oats which we harvested with a 12 ft. push binder with six horses. One of the horses broke loose one noon (about 2 miles from home) and ran away. He got too close to a barb wire fence, kicked into it and really cut his one hind leg and foot badly before I could get another horse and catch it. It bucked and kicked along the fence for about a mile before it was caught.

We had plowed about 700 acres and sowed it in wheat and later plowed and sowed about 700 acres in flax. We used a 30-60 Hart Paar with a John Deere 8 bottom plow, 2 sections of harrow and a drill, all coupled together.

We went round and round in the fields so we didn't have to lift the plow, etc. so often. In fact, on one field of 225 acres we didn't lift the plows one time. Lids on the grain drills were reversed so we could put the sacked seed on the plow platform and fill the drill on the go. Two men crews and working 2 - 12 hour shifts but the fields were all level and nice to work except for a lot of Russian thistles that were apt to clog the plow. Usually we raked and burned them before plowing.

We had 2 headers to use in harvest, I don't remember if they were 14 or 16 ft. but I believe they were 16 ft. Instead of the slow speed Hart Paar 60, we had one of the first Avery Tractors, a 20-35 two cylinder, opposed that would go 2 or 3 miles per hour and we cut 60 to 75 acres a day.