Henry Hobart Taylor


| November/December 1975



Pictures of Cornelius Aultman

The Aultman & Taylor companies carried pictures of Cornelius Aultman & Henry Hobart Taylor on the water tanks of their steam traction engines and on the tailings elevator of their separators and Clover Hullers.

156 West High Street, New Concord, Ohio 43762

HENRY HOBART TAYLOR

Next to Cornelius Aultman the most important personage in the founding of the Aultman & Taylor Manufacturing Company located in Mansfield, Ohio was Henry Hobart Taylor. Upon the mention of Henry Taylor he is usually recognized as having been an agent for C. Aultman & Co. and Nichols, Shepard and Company. While this is in fact true yet in and of itself fails to do justice to the man for he was involved in numerous other areas of business and industry. Little has been written about him and unfortunately much of it is erroneous so for this reason he is not as well known as is Aultman and many of the other men who were engaged in the manufacture and sale of threshing machinery. Consequently it is all the more important and in fact imperative that a more accurate and complete biographical sketch of this illustrious man should be presented. 1

Henry Hobart Taylor was born in Durhamsville near Oneida Creek, New York in the year of 1835. His father and family moved to Chicago in 1845 and engaged in merchandizing. Henry was ten years of age when the family moved to Chicago and he entered the public schools of that city. However at an early age he became a clerk in his father's store where through that experience received a business education and was initiated into the mercantile experience of the growing busy city of Chicago.

In 1854 the family moved to Freeport, Illinois. At that time Mr. Taylor was eighteen years of age and launched out for himself. He began his self-support although he had only one dollar in his pocket. He journeyed to Cincinnati, Ohio where he became employed by a druggist for the purpose of learning pharmacy. In that day it was common practice for a young man who wished to become a doctor, lawyer or a pharmacist to study, read and work with one of the older men as he practiced his profession. At the conclusion of an apprenticeship the young man was either declared competent to practice his profession or after passing an examination was licensed and accorded the right to follow his chosen profession. Mr. Taylor spent learning to become a pharmacist and mastered the art, but made no use of his knowledge of pharmacy during the rest of his life.

In 1856 he returned to Freeport, Illinois and at that time took out an agency for C. Aultman & Co. of Canton, Ohio. Thus there began an association which endured for a period of nineteen years. This could well be termed the turning point in his career for with the cultivation of the prairies his business increased rapidly.

In 1864 he became associated with Nichols, Shepard and Company of Battle creek, Michigan and also became a stockholder in that Company. In order to handle the increase in his business he established an agency in Chicago for the distribution of machinery manufactured by C. Aultman & Co. and Nichols, Shepard and Company of which he assumed personal responsibility. His business was extended throughout the northwestern states as well as to the Pacific coast and grew to large proportions. 2