History of Aultman & Taylor Part X

The debut of Aultman & Taylor's steam engines and tractors


| May/June 2002



1917 25 HP Aultman & Taylor

1917 25 HP Aultman & Taylor #9202, owned by Lyle and Randy Eckel.

Photo by Dr. Robert T. Rhode

This issue of the Iron-Men Album brings us to the 10th installment of Dr. Bixler's history of the Aultman & Taylor Company, as edited by Dr. Robert T. Rhode. The Album is serializing Dr. Bixler's book. Dr. Bixler, a professor at Muskingum College in New Concord, Ohio, passed away before he could publish the manuscript on which he had labored for many years. This installment looks at the debut of the steam engine and the Aultman & Taylor tractors.

Click here for part I of the history of Aultman & Taylor.
Click here for part II of the history of Aultman & Taylor.
Click here for part III of the history of Aultman & Taylor.
Click here for part IV of the history of Aultman & Taylor.
Click here for part V of the history of Aultman & Taylor.
Click here for part VI of the history of Aultman & Taylor.
Click here for part VII of the history of Aultman & Taylor.
Click here for part VIII of the history of Aultman & Taylor.
Click here for part IX of the history of Aultman & Taylor.

CHAPTER 10 

The Debut of the Steam Engine and the Aultman & Taylor Tractors

Allusion has already been made to the fact that the vibrator thresher required a steady power that was impossible to secure with the horse powers. Then, too, there arose in the major grain growing areas of the country a demand for a larger separator, but horsepowers were inadequate to operate those machines efficiently.

Under the pressure of these demands the companies began to build steam engines. At first portables then a few years later traction engines came into general use.

In spite of the skepticism that prevailed among the farmers, the demand for steam engines continued to grow apace. Among the first manufacturers to recognize and meet that demand was C.&G. Cooper Company of Mount Vernon, Ohio. During 1868-69 they built an experimental traction engine that was steered by horses.

Keenly aware of the changing conditions of the time, the Aultman & Taylor Manufacturing Company had no intention of permitting other companies to preempt the market. They quickly came to the realization that it would be necessary to build steam engines if they were to remain in business.