HISTORY OF A SILO


| November/December 1977



John Deere Model ''D'''

2

706 Pennsylvania Avenue, Mendota, Illinois 61342.

These three pictures are of filling the same silo about every ten years apart on the George Althaus farm, located on the old Chicago-Galesburg Road, Sublette Twp., Illinois, one mile west of the Henkel Bridge on U.S. 52 over the Illinois Central Railroad, northwest of Mendota, Illinois.

From Steam to Diesel. The first picture is taken in October, 1920 with Theo. Schmitz Gaar-Scott-Rumely steam engine belted to an Ohio in silage cutter. Teddy is on his engine minding his business as it took lots of power to run this hard pulling Ohio Cutter and blow the silage up to the top of this silo. This was a high silo for its day. It was built in 1918 when World War I was in full swing and is still there.

The next picture was taken in September. 1931 using a 1926 John Deere, Model 'D', and a 16-inch International In silage Cutter, which was the flywheel type and pulled much easier than the old Ohio lawn mower type did. It didn't do quite as good a job cutting the silage, though. They wanted to use their own tractor instead of the steam engine and burn distillate or kerosene instead of coal.

The third picture is a Caterpillar Diesel 'D2' belted to the same International 16 inch cutter in September 1939. Then, by now we could fill that silo with less than a 20-gallon tank of Diesel fuel. Notice the team of horses. My dad always had lots of good Belgian horses. The team on the smaller (second) picture is a team of Percheron horses. Now there is a bigger, higher silo besides this one and took only two days to put it there, as compared to the old silo built in World War I that took two months to build.