HOW WE TOOK OUR VACATION TRIP -1895


| September/October 1962



While the modern Farmer's method of taking a vacation trip is usually by railway train or automobile, there are indisputable points in favor of the method given in this article - a real personal experience narration.

The late summer and early fall's farm work - Corn - Plowing - Threshing - Hay harvesting, etc. was all cleaned up, and father decided that the whole family should take a trip to Grandfather's who lived about two hundred miles away. Consequently, on the first day of September, we all climbed into the farm wagon and started. The weather was beginning to grow cold; the team could travel to good advantage and we could better enjoy the trip than at any other time of the year. This was several years ago, and while our outfit served us very well it could be improved at small cost in this day, and would add greatly to the success of the trip.

Our wagon was fitted with ordinary bows, covered with coarse muslin. Ample bedding was stored in the wagon, it having a double box, and several days supply of bread and cookies was provided before the start. Various other eatables also were supplied, such as cold meat, fried chicken, jams, jellies, pie, etc.

A gun and some fishing tackle were taken along, and by use of these the larder was replenished at small cost and with much sport and recreation in fishing and hunting. Nuts, Paw-paws and persimmons also figured in the daily menu. In this way our expenses were practically nothing; the food the most wholesome and nutritious.

We would hitch up the team very early in the morning, while it was cool and pleasant, drive till it began to get warm (usually this was not about noon, and often not at all) then un-hitch for dinner.

Plenty of grass along the roadway, and here we turned the horses to graze, always having a little grain to give them. Dinner usually was a cold snack, with possibly a little game or fish, cooked in a skillet over a small fire. The tablecloth upon which we ate was spread under some shady tree, on the grass, or across some giant stump from which a tree had been cut.