Iron Man Of The Month

OF DAYTON DAILY NEWS AND RADIO'S JOES JOURNAL


| September/October 1973



Harold Motes

The Harold Motes set out for their favorite steam engine show. Lillie Mae has her Bible and sermon - Harold, his latest steam engine poem. Courtesy of Joe Fahnestock, Union City, Indiana 47390

Joe Fahnestock

UNION CITY, INDIANA.

'Good morning, friends and neighbors.

We want you all to know We are about to have our opening At the Darke County Steam Engine and Old Tractor Show.'

Name it, and Harold has written a poem about it - pleading his point in rhyme'n, meter or not. And it's all about those boyhood memories of the great age of steam threshing that lends that special flourish to his moving pen. Memories that come in flash-backs a hundred-fold as he wends his way amongst the iron horses that line the threshing reunion grounds wherever he 'tends.

'We have prayer by our chaplain.
There is an explosion in the sky;
Then there are whistles from all the steam engines;
Then our flag is raised up high.
Yes! We have our National Anthem.
And the whistles are so loud,
And the steam from the whistles Almost looks like a cloud.'

To our beloved bard, Harold Mote, the opening rituals of a steam engine reunion are as important as the very show itself. And the moving pen writes on in emphasis of the religious and patriotic fervor that once made America great and has been preserved, as have the mighty steam engines, to remind us of our heritage in the Promised Land. Though there be those, granted, who might think prayer is a big superficial and therefore dispensable at an engine shindig, not so our poet, Harold, whose wife, the Rev. Lillie Black Mote, invokes God's official blessing immediately following the gunpowder blast that sets the big Darke County Greenville, Ohio Show in motion. And, if Harold had not, by chance, met Lillie, he might never have been dragged to an engine show to find out how much fun he was missing. 'We were married in 1961,' says Lillie Mote. 'And I began dragging Harold to the Darke County Steam Threshers that year.'