It Was Not A Good Idea For This Case...


| July/August 1989



1309 E. 26th Hutchinson, Kansas 67502 As told by her father, Harlie Bolton

In the early days of Case steam engines and separators for threshing the small grains in South Dakota, one of the farmers purchased a threshing outfit. As it was delivered by train to a town twenty miles from home, he loaded his wagon with dried 'cow chips' for fuel in order to drive his purchase home.

That night, ten miles from home, as he and the factory representative camped for the night, the clouds came up threatening rain. The farmer, not wanting to get the new belts wet on his new machine, and as there was no other cover, put them in the firebox of the new engine.

The factory man, not knowing what the farmer had done, arose early to get the fire going in the boiler so they could get an early start.

Pretty soon the odor changed but the city man not knowing all the smells of the country, did not realize more was burning than cow chips. The farmer awoke to find his new machine belts were burned. The result was a delay while more belts were ordered from the factory to run the steam engine before the trip home could be completed.

This machine was purchased from Case Company co-owner Bert Case, uncle of my father, Harlie Bolton.