Letters


| July/August 1963



Miss Susan Hill

Here is a picture of Miss Susan Hill, oldest daughter of the late Tom Hill, builder of the engine. This lady has just passed her 98th. birthday and as you can see, is very hale and hearty at that age.

Ralph Hussong writes. . . . . . . . .

This company was widely known in the territory surrounding Quincy, Illinois in the period following 1880 at which time they built freight and passenger elevators, heavy iron castings such as store fronts, etc.

Along about 1892 this company entered the light duty steam engine field, producing a ROCKER valve engine, the engine concerning which this article is written about. As you can note it is a double cylinder opposed type engine. There are of course no piston rods in the pistons proper similar to ordinary gas engines.

This freak among steam engines surely must have been built as an experiment.

The writer of this article in later years became acquainted with the man who was chief mechanic at the of its building. This party was none other than the late A. H. Wiebmer, Sr., who later started the Wiebmer Machine Shop which is still operating under that name but under different ownership.

In assembling this information which, of course, could vary slightly as to time, the writer is indebted very greatly to the following people; Mr. A. H, Wiebmer, Jr., son of the designer, Mr. Elmer Becker, a retired machinist of Quincy, Illinois, Mr. Edward Long, a retired steam engineer of Quincy, Illinois, Mrs. Rhodia Davis, Mrs. Piggott, also daughters of Tom Hill and a Mrs. Marian Newman.

The company who made this engine was the SMITH-HILL Elevator Co. Along about 1898 these people merged with the OTIS Elevator Co. and their headquarters was moved to Chicago, Illinois and Mr. Hill moved to that city as an official. Soon after the turn of the century Mr. Hill returned to Quincy and was instrumental in forming the Quincy Engine Works about 1903 which specialized in heavy duty stationary steam engines of the CORLISS type. This company operated about ten years, then sold out to the OTIS Elevator Company, which came back to Quincy, Illinois with its plant.

janet wiebmer
3/23/2009 11:32:40 AM

This is a very interesting story about my grandfather.(A.H. Wiebmer) I will pass this down to my children.