LETTERS


| May/June 1961



The report chart shows the 24 Port Huron evaporating 8 lbs. water per lb. of coal. This is normally considered a fair evaporation factor in power plant work with even some water tub boilers fired by mechanical stokers, with a 12500 b.t.u. coal (2' screenings). The fact that the Port Huron had a crosshead pump and a feed water heater (heated by exhaust steam) accounts for approximately 10% more efficiency in Port Huron above the Advance. Mr. Blaker did not say if the Advance was a simple or compound, nor did he give the condition of fire-box, flues, etc. Also the mechanical condition of the engine, especially the piston rings and valve.

The writer would be happy if Mr. Blaker would supply me with Indicator Cards taken at full load of each engine, giving the size of cylinder bore and length of stroke, the r.p.m., steam pressure (gauge) when card was taken and scale of spring used. I would be happy to analyze them. In particular, the Baker engine which may have been a Uniflow with piston type valve.

I have owned 7 different engines excluding two of the same make and regarded the Advance, Russell and the little 10 x 11 24 hp Minneapolis engine equipped with Baker Balance valve as the three most economical ones. I still own a 25-85 twin cyl. Nichols & Shepard, but it is not one of the most economical. Somehow my liking had fallen to the 30 hp Avery Undermounted wish I had it today!

E. G. ROSEN, Benson, Minnesota

FROM CALIFORNIA -

Received the Nov-Dec copy of the ALBUM which I just subscribed to, and find the articles and illustrations quite interesting.

Came across a couple of old copies of Iron-Men Album a few weeks ago and was very much interested in an illustration entitled, 'Harvest hands on their way to the wheat fields of the Northwest 1890' made at Casselton, North Dakota. That is where I started my harvest career some 40 odd years ago.