LETTERS


| September/October 1962



Hand fed thresher

An 1870 Champion, hand fed, thresher made by the Waterloo Co., and in action at the Steam Threshers Reunion 1959. See Mr. Greenfield's letter.

Clement F. Greenfield

LETTER FROM ZOLLINGER

I have been interested in power farming all of my life. Horses and what they could do in the way of farming never did appeal to me. My father once said that his boys were not happy unless they had a monkey wrench in their hands and were in grease clear to their elbows. They would rather let the horses starve or run in the pature all summer while they did the work with a tractor.

The tractor we used was a 9-18 case (I still have it) and we credit the case with having kept us on the farm and not the horses. There were seven of us and we are all farmers. We each own our own farms.

We bought a large wheat farm in 1927 along with 125 head of horses that went with the place. We sold them, much to the disgust of the neighbors, the next day and bought two tractors. The neighbors promised us we would go broke trying to farm without horses. We went right on with the tractors and before four years was up, there were no horses used for farming in that valley.

In 1955, after looking for some time, L. K. Woods of Hendon and I found a 40 horse Case Tandom Compound steam engine. It was just as good as new. It is a 1896 model engine no 13184. I was able to buy it for $225.00. In the shed with it was a wooden Nichols and Shepherd 36-60 Thresher which I purchased. It was also in very good condition. It has a Hart blower and a Maytag feeder. The feeder has a canvass conveyer in it and so does the extension conveyor for the feeder.

At the time the outfit was in its 'hay day' they used a Model T Ford pick-up to do the chasing. I also bought this 1909 model ford.

I am not sure but this my be one of the last complete outfits left. The cook shack is also around.