National Threshers


| January/February 1961


Alvordton, Ohio

Owners Name

Make Of Engine

H. P. Raring

HP. Load Brake

Lbs. Of Coal Used

Lbs. Of Water Used

Lbs. Of Coal HP. HR.

Lbs. Of Water HP. HR.

Lbs. Of Water Eva. Lb. Coal

Engineer

John Holp

Advance

20-60

45.2

268

1472

5.93

32.56

5.49

John Holp

Wilford Bunyea

Harrison Jumbo

20-65

47.2

304

1691

6.44

35.8

5.56

A. H. Shear

National Threshers

Port Huron

19-65

50.22

234

1582

4.65

30.5

6.76

Peter Bucher

LeRoy Blaker

Port Huron

24-75

57.65

133

1164

2.32

20.2

8.75

LeRoy Blaker

Percy Sherman

Russell

25-75

61.12

218

1752

3.57

28.66

8.03

Percy Sherman

Raymond Fork

Baker

21-75

65.05

376

2080

5.8

31.94

5.26

Louis Fork

The above data is correct and was witnessed by a special committee and hundreds of visitors. The committee weighed the coal and water and checked the fire and water level at the beginning and end of each run. The engineers agreed to give each engine approximately ? its rated belt hp and about 10 minutes time under load for warming up before time for test to start. The brake hp used was James Watt's 33,000 lbs. one foot high in one minute -- not the 18,000 foot lbs. adapted by the automobile industry about 40 years ago.

The testing was done on the original Baker Prony brake and the hp load was at the brake, not at the engine flywheel or the indicated hp.

The A. D. Baker Company claimed the most economical steam traction engine. We challenged that claim for economy and the results show the 24-75 Port Huron 'Longfellow' high pressure Woolf compound the winner with a water (or steam) consumption of only 20.2 lbs. per hp.hr. The design and condition of the engine accounts for its economy in lbs. of water (or steam) per hp.hr. The average of all the other engines in this contest used over 50% more water and over 100% more coal per hp.hr.

This engine was equipped with crosshead boiler feed pump, exhaust steam feed water heater and firebox brick arch. This record equalled the economy run made by it Oct. 13, 1956 as described on page 16 of March-April 1957 issue of IRON-MEN ALBUM and it will do it again at Montpelier in June 1961.

Most of the credit for this economical engine is due to the Woolf compound cylinders and 'Longfellow' boiler. The Woolf compound cylinders uses the steam twice and has a mild exhaust. They do not waste their power with excessive back pressure 'Blasting the sky'