Past and Present

STEAM ENGINES and THRESHING MACHINES

| January 2005

  • mer Dickson’s 65 HP 1922 Case in 1971. David Bridge and his brother Ken are visible on the engineer’s platform
    Bridge Photo #1 (below): Homer Dickson’s 65 HP 1922 Case in 1971. David Bridge and his brother Ken are visible on the engineer’s platform.
  • The Bridge brothers (that’s David at left) on the rear platform of Homer G. Dickson’s Case in 1971
    Bridge Photo #2 (bottom left): The Bridge brothers (that’s David at left) on the rear platform of Homer G. Dickson’s Case in 1971. Homer’s neatly painted name on the back of the canopy should put to rest any doubts as to how he spelled his name.
  • Homer’s engine as it looks today, still running and his name still visible on the back of the canopy
    Bridge Photo 3 (bottom right): Homer’s engine as it looks today, still running and his name still visible on the back of the canopy.
  • Plowing with George Hedke’s 110 HP 1911 Case in 1976. David Bridge’s grandfather Leander Carlson is visible at left standing on the back of the engine watching the plow operators.
    Bridge Photo #4: Plowing with George Hedke’s 110 HP 1911 Case in 1976. David Bridge’s grandfather Leander Carlson is visible at left standing on the back of the engine watching the plow operators.
  • 50 HP 1916 Case, serial no. 33661, now belongs to the Southeast Nebraska Antique Steam Power Collectors, Inc.
    Brinkman Photo #2: 50 HP 1916 Case, serial no. 33661, now belongs to the Southeast Nebraska Antique Steam Power Collectors, Inc.
  • 50 HP 1916 Case, serial no. 33661.
    Brinkman Photo #1: 50 HP 1916 Case, serial no. 33661.
  • Ed Rabus’ rare Watertown steam traction engine next to an equally rare circa-1920 Oneida Motor Truck.
    Sindelar Photo #1 (left): Ed Rabus’ rare Watertown steam traction engine next to an equally rare circa-1920 Oneida Motor Truck.
  • Meredith Dittman built this 14 HP Port Huron 1/12-scale model working from images shown in a 1908 Port Huron catalog.
    Dittman Photo #1: Meredith Dittman built this 14 HP Port Huron 1/12-scale model working from images shown in a 1908 Port Huron catalog.
  • Oliver Crawford and unidentified engine at Bowen’s sawmill outside Pisgah, Ala., circa 1923.
    Crawford Photo #1: Oliver Crawford and unidentified engine at Bowen’s sawmill outside Pisgah, Ala., circa 1923.
  • Another view of the Watertown steam traction engine.
    Sindelar Photo #2 (below): Another view of the Watertown steam traction engine. Note the cast iron steam dome, which is removable. The engine is believed to have been built in 1889. Watertown Engine Co., Watertown, N.Y., was only on the scene for a short while in the 1880s and 1890s.

  • mer Dickson’s 65 HP 1922 Case in 1971. David Bridge and his brother Ken are visible on the engineer’s platform
  • The Bridge brothers (that’s David at left) on the rear platform of Homer G. Dickson’s Case in 1971
  • Homer’s engine as it looks today, still running and his name still visible on the back of the canopy
  • Plowing with George Hedke’s 110 HP 1911 Case in 1976. David Bridge’s grandfather Leander Carlson is visible at left standing on the back of the engine watching the plow operators.
  • 50 HP 1916 Case, serial no. 33661, now belongs to the Southeast Nebraska Antique Steam Power Collectors, Inc.
  • 50 HP 1916 Case, serial no. 33661.
  • Ed Rabus’ rare Watertown steam traction engine next to an equally rare circa-1920 Oneida Motor Truck.
  • Meredith Dittman built this 14 HP Port Huron 1/12-scale model working from images shown in a 1908 Port Huron catalog.
  • Oliver Crawford and unidentified engine at Bowen’s sawmill outside Pisgah, Ala., circa 1923.
  • Another view of the Watertown steam traction engine.

THIRD TIME A CHARM?

Reader David Bridge, 909 W. Center St., Sandwich, IL 60548, freely admits to a long love affair with steam. That's a good thing for the rest of us, as Dave clears up a point of identification and shares some great photographs. Dave writes:

The steam bug bit me at an early age, and my love for steam continues today with the help of your great magazine. I am writing to clarify a man's name, the late Homer G. Dickson.

In the September/October 2004 issue, I was fascinated by John Ross' Pontiac show memories. I was reading the article about some engines well known to me, and although I noticed the Dickson name was spelled incorrectly as "Dickenson," it had no influence on me as I was fascinated by the photo of the 1893 12 HP Case engine owned by Homer. What a beautiful engine!

In regards to the 65 HP Case mentioned in John's article, I was compelled to send photos of this engine. However, time went by and the November/December issue came out, and yet another mention of Homer G. Dickson, correcting the misspelling from the first article. But the correction was incorrect. Homer's name was misspelled in this article, too, as Dixon. So, to set the record straight, it is Homer G. Dickson.



Photos #1 and #2 were taken in 1971, and show my brother Ken and me on the back of Homer's 65 HP 1922 Case. Note that Homer's name is on the canopy. My grandfather Leander Carlson took this photo.

Photo #3 was taken in May 2004. Homer's 1922 Case is now located at the Kendall County Historical Society Lyons Farm at Rt. 71 and Van Emmon Road in Yorkville, Ill. The historical society had its first annual Tractor and Engine Show May 22-24, 2004. Note that Homer's name can still be seen on the canopy.



SUBSCRIBE TO FARM COLLECTOR TODAY!

Farm Collector April 16Farm Collector is a monthly magazine focusing on antique tractors and all kinds of antique farm equipment. If it's old and from the farm, we're interested in it!

Save Even More Money with our SQUARE-DEAL Plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our SQUARE-DEAL automatic renewal savings plan. You'll get 12 issues of Farm Collector for only $24.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and send me one year of Farm Collector for just $29.95.




Facebook Pinterest YouTube

Classifieds