Pioneer Village

Birth of a heritage museum in the nation's heartland

| March/April 1956

  • Mrs. T. C. Jensen
    Harold Warp's sister, Mrs. T.C. Jensen, who with her husband manages the Pioneer Village, holds a saddle bag of Pony Express days. In the bags were found two undelivered letters dated 1861.
  • The Pioneer Village
    The Pioneer Village, perched on two city blocks, facing U. S. Highway G, at Minden, Neb., 132 miles west of Lincoln, houses many thousands of bygone items in 12 buildings.
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-1
    Skipper Warp, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Warp, cutting the ribbon on opening day, June 6, 1953, marking the opening of the Pioneer Village, Minden, Neb.
  • The steam threshing outfit
    The steam threshing outfit runs every Sunday in the summertime for the kiddies as well as for the old-timers who visit the Pioneer Village. It is amusing to see the expression on the faces of both young and old when asked if they'd like to blow the whistle.
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-2
    In the Transportation lineup, from ox-cart to airplane, is the old stage coach and early day wood burner locomotive of 1850, with Harold Warp, founder of Pioneer Village in the foreground.
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-3
    The old general store, with shelves piled high with merchandise of yesteryear, carried many of the forerunners of merchandise found in the hardware stores of today.
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-4
    This 1830 vintage kitchen is but one of five period kitchens found at Pioneer Village. The fireplace is built of stone from the old White House in Washington, D.C. Standing in the kitchen is T. C. Jensen, who with Mrs. T. C. Jensen, are managers of the Villa.
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-5
    This natty-looking 1902 curved-dash Olds was the height of fashion at the beginning of the Automobile Era. At the wheelies Harold Warp (right side). Oscar Olson, the passenger, is chief restorer of these ancient items.

  • Mrs. T. C. Jensen
  • The Pioneer Village
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-1
  • The steam threshing outfit
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-2
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-3
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-4
  • IMA_V11_I2_Mar_1956_09b-5

Here is the story of a very interesting project which was once a dream of Harold Warp, and then he made that dream come true. I guess that is what dreams are for. Anyway, here is the story as we found it in Hardware Retailer of May 1955. You will enjoy the story and will want to visit the Village at the first opportunity. — The Editor

Almost in the geographical middle of the United States (Minden, Neb.), a new landmark for sightseers is in evidence. This is the home of Pioneer Village, which in the short two years it has been open to the public has gained national fame as a unique achievement of restoring for posterity the mode of life of our ancestors. Newsweek, in its April 15th issue, named Pioneer Village as one of the country's top new tourist lures for last year.

This is the dream of Harold Warp, president of Flex-O-Glass, Inc., and has become a reality at Minden, Neb.

Sprawled over two city blocks are the 12 buildings that house the unique museum. In this picturesque setting is displayed the evolution of America from 1830-1950. Located on U.S. Highway 6, 132 miles west of Lincoln, Neb., Pioneer Village contains 17,000 items of bygone days. The village did not develop overnight. It received its initial spark — when the country school Harold Warp had attended as a boy was to be sold to the highest bidder. Mr. Warp's bid gained him the school house with records intact. Soon after this, the first church in his home town had to be moved to make way for a modern stone structure, so Warp bought this, too.



As time went by he had to find a place to put the many items he was acquiring. Minden, Neb., was the natural choice, for it was from this town that Harold Warp started in 1924, bound for Chicago with $800 and the patent for a product called 'Flex-O-Glass.'

By 1950, the idea for Pioneer Village had evolved into the planning stage. At this point Warp enlisted the aid of his sister, Mrs. T.C. Jensen, and her auctioneer husband, in collecting the many keepsakes.

Catherine Swaim_1
2/23/2009 8:29:30 PM

This is a wonderful place to view equipment and cars, trucks hobbies, and so many things of the past. It is wonderful that Mr. Harold Warp and his family arekeeping this up and going. We spent 3 days and still didn't get to see everything. The Motel and Resturant are so handy and are very good. Everyone is so nice and it is really an educational visit for children. I would encourage all to go and see it. We were there in August and it was so great. Thanks to all athae family for keeping this open.


Catherine Swaim_2
2/23/2009 8:25:22 PM

This is a wonderful place to view equipment and cars, trucks hobbies, and so many things of the past. It is wonderful that Mr. Harold Warp and his family arekeeping this up and going. We spent 3 days and still didn't get to see everything. The Motel and Resturant are so handy and are very good. Everyone is so nice and it is really an educational visit for children. I would encourage all to go and see it. We were there in August and it was so great. Thanks to all athae family for keeping this open.




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