Farm Collector

POST CARD

By Staff

Pictured above is an Avery under mounted steamer we rebuilt and
installed a new all welded boiler.   The third shot is of
the train set-up, which we drove to Pontiac over Route 116. Behind
the engine is a water tank; the old boiler off of the engine -cut
away for display; a trailer load of old church, school, farm and
locomotive bells eighteen in all. Weight is 5600 pounds. Then there
is a wagon filled with bus seats to give rides to people who attend
the reunions.

It took two years to get this boiler made up and we have 170
pounds of steam on board. This makes this old steamer alive and
ready to go. We have done everything there is to do with it, but
have not yet pulled a plow.

The trip to Pontiac is fourteen miles. It took 7 hours and 450
gallons of water and ton of coal. So, when people say that
Averystakea lot of coal and water, this should be proof of that or
the engineer does not know much about steam engines. (This concerns
only me.) Courtesy of Truman Koopman, Flanagan, Illinois 61740.

My dandy Reeves ‘Mr. Reeves’ 16-50 hp. double single,
built in 1918. Stored in Hixton, Wisconsin. Engine and boiler are
in excellent repair and has original decals. I hope it can escape
forever the ‘junker’s torch.’ It has a musical
pep-pep-pep exhaust all its own. It attracts much attention
wherever it is taken for shows.

Courtesy of Wilbur A. Skaar, 1429 Benton St., Alameda,
California 94501.

Photograph taken August 4, 1959. At the summit 6293 feet up!
These little locomotives make the 3 mile climb to Mt. Washington in
about an hour and fifteen minutes.

This is a stereoscope picture. If you will cut it on the heavy
lines and paste on light cardboard with rubber cement, you will
have a three dimensional picture you can view in an old fashioned
type stereoscope viewer.

Photograph taken August 4, 1959. At the summit 6293 feet up!
These little locomotives make the 3 mile climb to Mt. Washington in
about an hour and fifteen minutes.

This is a stereoscope picture. If you will cut it on the heavy
lines and paste on light cardboard with rubber cement, you will
have a three dimensional picture you can view in an old fashioned
type stereoscope viewer.

  • Published on Jul 1, 1970
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