POST CARD


| May/June 1981

  • Garr-Scott engine
    Pictured is a Garr-Scott engine owned by Lias Parker. Picture taken around 1890. (No courtesy line!)
  • Scene of the farm
    Courtesy of Jerome W. Weldele, Buffalo, Minnesota 55313.
    Jerome W. Weldele
  • 16 HP double simple Reeves

  • 28-75 Sawyer Massey
    Courtesy of Brian Burns, R.R. 2, Hawkestone, Ontario, Canada.
    Brian Burns
  • Steam hoisting mule
    Courtesy of Ralph Jackson, R.D. 1, Marshalluille, Ohio 44645.
    Ralph Jackson
  • JI Case engine

  • Clarence Bockman on steam engine
    Courtesy of Clarence Bockman, and sent in by Herbert Reese, Sr., Greenbush, Minnesota 56726.
    Clarence Bockman

  • Garr-Scott engine
  • Scene of the farm
  • 16 HP double simple Reeves
  • 28-75 Sawyer Massey
  • Steam hoisting mule
  • JI Case engine
  • Clarence Bockman on steam engine

Our cover girls this month are the Hoffmasters Anne, the blonde and Joyce, the brunette with the family's pet a 16 HP double simple Reeves built in 1906 (No. 3547). The young ladies are the daughters of Lyle and Barbara Hoffmaster, of Bucyrus, O. The family regularly takes part in the Midwest Old Settlers and Threshing Association Show at Mt. Pleasant, Ia., and attends other rallies as well. The Hoffmaster story, a delight for us to present, begins on page 7 of this issue. The photos are from the family, whose home is at 1845 Marion Road, Bucyrus, O. 44820.

This early 1890s scene is at my great grandfather's farm, three miles east of Buffalo. This is a complete Advance rig. Thresher is hand feed and webb stacker. Man on water pump is H. R. Schmidt. His son, Raymond, is an engineer at our show each year (Pelican Lake). Man sitting on engine is Christ Hohl. Other man is Oscar Schmidt.

28-75 Sawyer Massey. Restored and owned by George Hutchinson, R.R. 1, Kilworthy, Ontario.

This steam hoisting mule was built in 1S90 at the J. F. Beyers Machine Company in Ravenna, Ohio. It is in good working condition. I show it at both gas and steam shows. It is 12 HP, two cylinder and weighs two tons.



At the factory it was mounted on 6 x 6 wood skids and moved about on the job at Wooster, Ohio by horsepower. It was used in construction of new buildings. One job was the building of the chapel at the college in Wooster, the year 1900. It was used in and around Wooster until 1915, when gas took over and it was stored in a barn until 1968, when I got possession of the Mule.

It is a tube-type boiler and I worked on it four months and is now running good. I put wheels under it in place of the wooden skids to move it around.