POST CARD


| November/December 1970

  • Burlington and Quincy Railroad
    Steam on the Burlington and Quincy Railroad, north of Yorkville in the early 1920's. Courtesy of Walter C. Bieritz, Route 2, Box 168, Yorkville, Illinois 60560.
    Walter C. Bieritz
  • Third scale model
    Shown is a one third scale model of a Russell Steam Engine at the Platte County Missouri Steam Show. Mr. Pat Green of Smithville, Missouri (standing) spent approximately 2500 hours building this engine. Mr. Robin Lewis, also of Smithville (seated) helped
    Mike Kane
  • Threshing outfit
    A scene of the Miller Bros, threshing outfit taken about 1907 or 1908 at South Haven, Minnesota. The outfit consisted of an 18 hp. Advance Compound Engine and an Advance Separator. The two men standing on the engine platform are my Dad (right) and my Uncl
    Herbert Miller
  • Good harvesters
    I am sending a few picture that you might use. While the Jack Rabbit pictures are not in line with the subject matter of the album, they are good harvesters as well as well-versed in arithmetic, being good at adding to their numbers by multiplying rapidly
    Diedrick L
  • Steam engine
    This is a shot of the last steam engine I built. I have built seven but this is my last one. I am now walking on crutches. I sold five of my engines and have two left. I just finished this engine in this past year. Courtesy of Ted Spencer, Route 1, Fairgr
    Ted Spencer
  • Our steam and gas engines
    This picture was taken from an old issue of Prairie Farmer. I have here the October 31,1942, issue. It shows the sad fate of many of our steam and gas engines. Question. What kind of engine is it? Courtesy of Walter C. Bieritz, Route 2, Box 168, Yorkville
    Walter C. Bieritz
  • Driving two wagons
    I am sending a few picture that you might use. While the Jack Rabbit pictures are not in line with the subject matter of the album, they are good harvesters as well as well-versed in arithmetic, being good at adding to their numbers by multiplying rapidly
    Diedrick L
  • J. I. Case steam plow
    J. I. Case steam plow outfit on the farm of Henry Molleken of Moreland, Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1914. Looks like a 110 Case engine to mehow about it?? Courtesy of Walter C. Bieritz, Route 2, Box 168, Yorkville, Illinois 60560.
    Walter C. Bieritz
  • 20 hp. simple engine
    A Gaar-Scott sawmill and a Reeves 20 hp. simple engine, it is in The Little Wabash River bottom, about 7 miles northwest of Effingham, Illinois. That is me on the engine and my little brother, Charles, at the mill. This photo was taken shortly before we m
    Virgil Jansen
  • The American Threshermen
    I am a member of the American Threshermen Power Progress Show at Pinckneyville. III. I usually run D. R. Bartimus' 18 hp. rear mounted Keck-Gonnerman there. That's the other picture of the K. G. on a fan at Pinckneyville, Illinois. Courtesy of Virgil Jans
    Virgil Jansen

  • Burlington and Quincy Railroad
  • Third scale model
  • Threshing outfit
  • Good harvesters
  • Steam engine
  • Our steam and gas engines
  • Driving two wagons
  • J. I. Case steam plow
  • 20 hp. simple engine
  • The American Threshermen

 The farmers divided into two groups and proceeded to minimize the population explosion of the species by driving two wagons; one on each lateral side of a field of grass or pasture, stubble or corn stalks, having a wire attached between them and dragging it over the field while hunters walked behind the wire and shot the Jack Rabbits as they jumped out of their hiding places.

The group that had the most killed rabbits was served a supper by the losing group. Some of the rabbits were sent to markets in the cities.

 Incidentally, a Jack Rabbit travels faster than a traction engine. Courtesy of Diedrick L. Dalke, 14 D Auburn Court, Alexandria, Virginia 22305.

 The farmers divided into two groups and proceeded to minimize the population explosion of the species by driving two wagons; one on each lateral side of a field of grass or pasture, stubble or corn stalks, having a wire attached between them and dragging it over the field while hunters walked behind the wire and shot the Jack Rabbits as they jumped out of their hiding places.



The group that had the most killed rabbits was served a supper by the losing group. Some of the rabbits were sent to markets in the cities.

 Incidentally, a Jack Rabbit travels faster than a traction engine. Courtesy of Diedrick L. Dalke, 14 D Auburn Court, Alexandria, Virginia 22305.