POSTCARD

By Staff
1 / 10
Keck-Gonnerman double owned by Cox Bros., at Ingraham, Illinois. Keck-Gonnerman built the greatest variety of engines of any company and they were as good as any.
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This Frick engine had a birthday June 9th, 1957 and was 43 years old on that day. It belongs to C. W. Thornhill, R. D. 2, Culpeper, Virginia, who saved some wheat and threshed September 8th, 1956. That is Mr. Thornhill's son who is keeping an eagle eye on
3 / 10
Mr. Ernest Short and daughter Freda, inspects the smoke box of Cox Bros., Keck-Gonnerman. That is the dirty end of an engine, Freda.
4 / 10
Threshing clover seed on the Roselle Raisch farm, September, 1956. No. 8 Birds all Huller belongs to Mr. Raisch. 21-75 Baker engine belonging' to Paul Raum and his son Bob, on the engine. Walter Raum on ground, and Roselle Raisch on the truck. Courtesy of
5 / 10
HEAD RIG AND CARRIAGE ON THE MILL OF THE ERWIN HARDWOOD COMPANY, HARRISON, ARKANSAS. COURTESY OF END E. STEVENSON, HARRISON, ARK.
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A 40-80 Avery; 30-60 Rumely; 25 hp. Minneapolis owned and on the farm of D. H. Roen, Comstock, Minnesota.
8 / 10
Mr. V. H. Stroud's Rig threshing wheat, December 1st, 1956 on his farm. 20 hp. Aultman-Taylor No. 9357 and a 36x60 Advance Rumley separator. Courtesy of V. H. Stroud, 319 E. 16th Street, Hutchinson, Kansas.
9 / 10
Avery Alberta Special of 1913-No. 5015. 7?x10. Pressure 180 lb. PSIG. Owned by Charles H. Twiss, Tower Hill, Illinois. The picture was taken in 1918. Scrapped in the late 30's. Sent to us by his son, Albert E. Twiss, Tower Hill, Illinois, who says he was
10 / 10
This wagon was owned by Mr. William Hill back in 1850. In 1882 it was sold to James Lafferty and he owned it until 1925 when he sold it to Charles Lafferty. It was in the Somerset (Penna.) Sesquicentennial Parade July 2 and 5, 1956. It was pulle

Here is something interesting we met up with on our trip this
summer. 8 hp. Advance engine of 1888, owned by Benny Heggrude,
Cooly, North Dakota. An S. S. Messenger thresher made at Tatamy,
Pennsylvania, in 1888 and owned by John Sandstrom, Lone Tree, North
Dakota. That is one of the neatest rigs we have seen for a long
time. It was worth the trip. Mr. Sandstrom is a most interesting
fellow. He has a museum of his own. His lawn is a dream. Paul
Bunyan and his blue calf stand serene amid stumps from the
Petrified Forest and realistic stumps made by John from concrete.
Make a trip to Lone Tree.

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Farm Collector Magazine
Farm Collector Magazine
Dedicated to the Preservation of Vintage Farm Equipment