POSTCARD


| September/October 1957

  • Reeves 32 Cross Compound and Reeves 40-63 Separator
    A 1912 scene of a Reeves 32 Cross Compound and a Reeves 40-63 Separator threshing flax near Drinkwater, Saskatchewan, Canada. The flax was a heavy crop on new breaking. This is the last day of the season's run. Bernard Dale, Briercrest, Sask., Canad
  • Reamer's Hobby Engine
    Reamer's Hobby Engine. Harold started operating steam engines when he was 17 years old. He is still fond of them and now has this half-scale model Case 60 for his Hobby. It has 5 hp. on the drawbar and 15 hp. in the belt. Harold Reamer, Sr., 3595 Reamer R
  • Engineers at D an Zehr's 1956 Meet
    This is the group of Engineers at D an Zehr's 1956 Meet. They look as though they were having a good time or else are well fed. Likely both Courtesy of Leo Clark, Washington, Illinois.
    Leo Clark
  • A 25 hp. Tandem Compound Mogul
    A 25 hp. Tandem Compound Mogul taken from a 1901 Aultman catalog. Courtesy of Harry Trego, Halstead, Kansas
    Harry Trego
  • National Threshers Chorus
    This picture needs no title except to say to those far away that this is the National Threshers Chorus at Montpelier, Ohio, 1956. It does your soul good just to look at them. You should have heard them sing.
  • Corliss engine
    Mother-daughter and wife of A. M. Weiss, 632 Summit, Alton, Illinois, and his Corliss engine. He says he needs a good boiler for this engine. At least 160 lbs. pressure. He is going to belt to 110 volt A. C. generator and operate antique electric trains.
  • A. M. Weiss Corliss engine
    Close up of the A. M. Weiss Corliss engine. The base is cast iron and all valve gears are nickel plated. Corliss engines have four valves two intake and two exhaust

  • Reeves 32 Cross Compound and Reeves 40-63 Separator
  • Reamer's Hobby Engine
  • Engineers at D an Zehr's 1956 Meet
  • A 25 hp. Tandem Compound Mogul
  • National Threshers Chorus
  • Corliss engine
  • A. M. Weiss Corliss engine
This is the first loader picture we have had in the ALBUM. The loader picks up the Whole shock (some call them Stooks) and elevates it into the rack. In good grain it will put on a load in four minutes. This machine cut the old twenty-man crew down to ten. It was necessary to shock the grain in straight rows and then you just drove the loader down the shock row. They were first pulled with four horses and later with a traction engine. They came out about 1911 and cost $800. They were one of the greatest labor saving devices of the threshing era. Courtesy of Bernard Dale, Briercrest, Saskatchewan, Canada.