Rough & Tumble Report


| November/December 1974



Peerless engine

Clarence Wile, of near Landisville, Pa., operating the next-to-last Peerless engine ever made, at Rough & Tumble Reunion, 1974. Steam gas photo.

Box 146, Mt. Royal, New Jersey 08061

I think that the 26th show of the Rough and Tumble should be placed on record as being the largest and most interesting since the organization was founded. Even the mid-week days were exceptional as compared to other years, and the week-end days were almost to the limit.

Three new additions were added this year, the first being the new driveway. This has been constructed from the lower entrance, all the way along the property line and back to the tractor pull site, giving a far easier access to the rear parking area. Vehicles can now come and go far quicker than with the old congested system, and the parking in the front left for members and exhibitors.

The second addition is a 60 x 40 cinder block model building with plenty of tables. To complete this by show-time was quite a rush, but by the vigor and efforts of Messrs. Mc Vey and Montgomery and all of the other members connected with it, the tables were filled and the models ran. Thursday I saw Walt Kleinfelder still cranking in steam line fittings, Larry Parker wiring up for watts and R. J. crawling around somewhere up in the rafters running a roll of Romex, Our old model shed looked rather bare for the first couple of days but by Saturday afternoon, this too was full. Never had I seen such a collection of models and I am sure that it must be one of the largest, or even the largest in the country.

Our other addition was a 100 ft. run of elevated model railroad track to accommodate 1 in. and 3/4 in. scale model steam operated locomotives. Frank Vintschger brought along a cute little Mogul 2-6-0 in 3/4 in. scale and how amazed the folks were to see this little engine that weighs not more than 30 lbs. stride off with Frank at the throttle and 'Tiny Miller' sitting behind as passenger. I took along my 1 in. scale Hudson and after I had the safety lifting, I found myself hauling the children and the not so bashful grown-ups too. My hope is that for our next reunion we can have more enthusiasts in this field that will bring along their engines, then by working out a roster, we can have trains running all day long. A nice oval track would have been great so that we could have continuous running but I must leave this to future enthusiasm.

My job for this year was to see that 'Little Toot' was kept rolling and roll the passengers we did. Three young fellows: Scott, Grant, and Tim made an excellent engine crew plus the fact that the painting and dolling up that they did, showed an interest that isn't often found these days. Such as this restores one's trust in the young besides the knowledge that steam is still in good hands. The brass was all polished and the headlight was fixed, and this inspired me to construct a small turbine generator. There was no time to complete it for the show, but I know that for another, this little addition will be affixed to 'Little Toots' steam dome and singing its steady tune.