SCOTT-CARVER


| March/April 1979



Minneapolis steam engine

Courtesy of R. G. Lins, 13613 4 Avenue, South, Burnsuille, Minnesota 55337.

R. G. Lins

1511 Iglehart Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 55104

August 12 and 13, 1978 was the date of the 14th Annual Scott Carver Show. The site of the show is located about two miles southwest of Jordan, Minnesota near Highway 169.

The weather was ideal and a good sized crowd was in attendance both days. The show area is always an interesting place, with something for everyone of all ages, where the talent and ability of the great people of the past generations combined engineering and mechanical skills to produce efficient machinery for the farm, the railroads, factories and all industries. Their efforts helped foreign countries as well, and we in turn received many useful inventions from them.

When I arrived at the show on Saturday forenoon, lumber sawing was in progress. Joe Selly with his 22 HP Advance, was on the power end with Frank Boehne as the sawyer. A large lineup of gas tractors of all sizes were being serviced for the afternoon parade.

I dropped into the galvanized iron exhibition building where Ray Lins and Jack Strand have a large collection of stationary steam engines which they have purchased and restored during the last 10 years. I will try to list some of them. One of the fine engines I have seen there is a 52 HP Howell engine owned by Dennis Krill and Jack Strand. Another is a 36 HP Atlas, 110 RPM acquired from the Gluck Brewery of Minneapolis; a 42 HP James Leffel engine owned by Ray Lins; an upright 7x7 engine belongs to Mr. Lins; an upright owned by Lins and Strand, along with two upright engines, one 2? x 3? used in a Stillwater, Minnesota, creamery, the other a center crank upright of about the same size, made in Germany. There is also a 12 HP Troy engine. These engines are ready to run on steam piped from a 35 HP wood fired boiler placed outside. While the above list is not complete, it gives some idea of the fine exhibit these fellows have built up and are still building.

A blacksmith shop, located in this building is operated by Ralph Harvey, a building contractor of the Minnetonka, Wayzata area who does blacksmithing as a hobby. He makes miniature horseshoes which he sells for souvenirs. While he shapes the hot iron with his hammer at the anvil, his wife, Mary Jane answers questions and sells horseshoes. Martin Luebke was his assistant blacksmith. Mr. Harvey is building a 1/4 gauge model railroad engine using alcohol for fuel. As we leave the building, we pass a huge 175 HP steam boiler which they hope to have installed by the time another show rolls around.