SIXTY YEARS WITH STEAM


| July/August 1967



Darawing of a boiler system

CONTINUED FROM LAST ISSUE

1402 South 19th Street New Castle, Indiana 47362

Our next addition to the plant was a new air compressor. The company bought a new Ingersoll Rand Cross compound air compressor which was electric driven. It had a 600 H.P. electric motor, 2300 volts directly on the crank shaft between the two cylinders. What I mean, the air cylinders were cross compound, our two steam driven Worthington compressors were cross compound, on the steam and air both.

The plant was buying a lot of electric power from the Public Service Co., so this compressor just meant buy more electric power. More steam hammers were being added to the forge shop so our steam load was gradually growing up. The mill rights set up the new compressor with Mr. Taylor's help and my help also. I understood Mr. Taylor to say, 'We will set up the new compressor, but when it is ready to run, we will have a man come from the Ingersoll factory and start it up.' When it was about ready to run I called up Mr. Taylor and I said, 'When is the man coming from Ingersoll Rand to start up the new compressor?' He said, 'There is no man coming from Ingersoll Rand.' I said, 'Who is going to start it up?' He says, 'You are.' I was a little non pleased, but I said, 'Okay, she will roll tomorrow.' Mr. Taylor had previously told me the new machine had cost $42000.00. Mr. Taylor was an expert mechanic and electrician; also he had spent a number of years installing power plants in the business buildings in Chicago and Detroit, Michigan. The new compressor had full push button control and the new feather valves on the air cylinders.

Before this, the Company bought an old Ingersoll Rand compressor with a 675 H.P. motor directly connected. It proved to be a lemon and the factory did not keep it long. They must have bought it awfully cheap, maybe at junk price. But I got a lot of experience out of that deal.

The new compressor gave very little trouble and in two days was running 24 hours a day. That helped out wonderful on our shortage of compressed air.

About this time Mr. Taylor called me and said, 'Our boiler room foreman is quitting, and I am going to turn the whole power house over to you.' I said, 'I don't want to take anybody's job away from them.' He said, 'You are not. He quit, and if you don't take the job, we will have to find somebody else to take his place.' So there was not much else to do but take it. Of course this was another promotion - with a slight raise in pay which was welcome. However, this added a lot of work onto me. But in those days I thrived on hard work.