SOOT IN THE FLUES


| January/February 1981



Soot in the flues

Now you and I both know you will receive this magazine long before New Year's Day, but this is the Jan.-Feb. issue of 1981 and so I am going to start this column out with a little something to think about for the new year--called The Unmarred Page by Grace Noll Crowell from Tapestries of Life book--Let us not forget the revelry and the din--That ushered in the new year late last night;--Let us be mindful that God hands us each-- A beautiful white page on which to write--Our record of the days He gives, and He asks only that we live them worthily.

To begin with the letters, here comes one from JOE HABEGER, 900 Northeast 8th Street, Madison, South Dakota 57042: 'I found the article on Keystone Skimmers in your Sept.-Oct. issue to be most interesting as I have a #3. I hope to complete the restoration of this machine within the next year or two. The only other one we know of is at Charleroi, Pennsylvania, and the man who has it also has a #4.1 would like to know of any others that may still be around. Maybe, like the Big Four, there are more than we think.

By the way, add one more Big Four west of the Mississippi as one has been exhibited here at Prairie Village for several years.'

Next communication comes from MELVIN R. GRENVIK, 115-lst Avenue N.6, Kenmare, North Dakota 58746: 'Congratulations again on the continued fine quality of the magazine and on a challenging Unclassified Photos Section. For those interested, here is how I read them from Nov.-Dec. issue.

No. 1--the engine is an early Gaar Scott reverse mount single cylinder 13 HP. No. 2--An Advance Rumely with special freighting wheels and a canopy that might not be the original. No. 3--This is a Russell, probably 16 to 20 HP and burning straw? No. 4--This Nichols & Shepard double simple is likely the 20 HP version. No. 5--The Case in this photo could be either the 36 HP or 45 HP models--the young fellows standing by the drive wheel make for a tricky perspective. No. 6--another Russell, judging from the distinctive crown on the smoke stack and the arrangement of the governor belt. The width of the driver suggests about 16 HP. No. 7--here is an Advance straw burner with homemade bunkers and canopy.

I am working to put together a short article on horsepower ratings of steam traction engines, a subject on which there seems to be much confusion. I will send it along when I get it finished if it makes sense. (Please do, we'll be looking for it.) Thanks again for a fine magazine. (Thank you for writing, we enjoy hearing from you and we need more articles--Anna Mae.)