SOOT IN THE FLUES


| May/June 1985



Soot in the flues

Hey Folks, it's Spring! Isn't that great? Come on, roll those engines out of the shed, get them steamed up betch a some of you have done that already. I know you're all excited and eager for the upcoming show season. Don't blame you a bitjust don't forget to contact me with the stories and going-onswe are all interested in passing any new information and all those little tidbits that make the reunions so pleasant and interesting.

I love the stories from the Well-springs of Wisdom by Ralph L. Woods and I believe you like to share them with methis one is called Positive Thinking... Some years ago two competing salesmen for shoe manufacturers arrived simultaneously in Africa to develop markets for their companies. Both men headed for the unexploited interior. After a few weeks one of the salesmen cabled his company that he was returning home on the next boat because of the lack of sales opportunities since the natives did not wear shoes.

The other salesman at about the same time sent off this terse cable to his company: 'Send quick millions of pairs of shoes all sizes, colors, styles because the natives here have no shoes.' (It's all the way you look at it, isn't it?).

And now on to the better parts of the column as we peek into the communications from the Iron Men Album Family...

HOMER D. RUFENER, Route 2, Box 157, Sardis, Ohio 43946 sends a welcome comment in his short letter: 'Your magazine is the most prized magazine in the house; next is the Gas Engine Magazine, to which I am a current subscriber. I've read the ones we have through and through countless times. The stories are very interesting, informative and sometimes, very funny. Most of all, it's entertaining! I am rather young, but can relate somehow to the stories the writers tell. The writers are one of a kind, each of them; because they are people, just like everyone else! Here's wishing you good luck, and hope the magazine will continue indefinitely!' (Thanks Homer, glad to hear those good words).

Some information on a retired locomotive that has been put to work again comes from H. J. BERNY, 209 W. Sprague, Edinburg, Texas 78539: 'I am sending some news about an old steam engine returning to work. This took place in Huntington, West Virginia. This locomotive was retired 28 years ago when diesels took over the nation's rails, but recently began hauling coal cars three days a week on the 100-mile run between Huntington and Hinton. The test runs are the final step in a locomotive-design project that government and industry officials say could make the country more energy-independent and help put unemployed miners back to work.