SOOT IN THE FLUES


| November/December 1978



Soot in the flues

Hi Friends! With this issue out I'd say the reunions have paraded by one by one for another season. We do hope you've found much enjoyment in your hobby activities and you meet the nicest folks agree?

CLIFF MAGNUSON, Glasford, Illinois, R. R. 2, 61533 says: 'I am interested in your Iron-Men Album. I lived during a period when threshing was done with steam power. To an extent, smaller tasks were accomplished by horse drawn instruments known as horsepowers. These unloaded corn and connected to speed jacks to saw wood clean grain, wood boring machines etc. The invention of the steam engine brought to agriculture the mechanical age. It also meant improvements on crude replicas of the pioneer people's ideas of improving and enlarging hand tools to animal power. I'm pleased to no end to the people who collect and keep alive America's glorious past for people to enjoy for real, that was every day living fifty and more years ago......A Grateful Friend of Early Gas and Steam Farm Power.'

From SCOTT McCORMICK, Box 421, Princeton, Wisconsin 54968 comes a note: 'In the Iron Men Album for September-October, I saw some unclassified photos. I'll tell you about unclassified photo No. 5. I took that picture right here in town in 1932. That was the picture of the steam roller. That roller belonged to Dodge County and was operated by Walter Smith. He is the man in the picture. They had started to put blacktop on State Highway 23. I took that picture right close to where I now live.

I was at the Dodge County Show and they had a nice crowd. I hope to get there again next year. Hope this information helps someone.'

RAY JONES, President of Pioneer Engineer's of Ind. Inc., 133 Hillenbrand Avenue, Batesville, Indiana 47006 sends this information: 'In the unclassified photos of the September-October issue on the bottom of page 30 is a picture taken at one of the annual reunions of the Pioneer Engineer Club. I am sorry I cannot give you the exact date, but would be in the early 50s. The first engine in the row is my 12-36 Russell #13360 and mounted on boiler #13459. It was built and shipped from Massillon, Ohio, in June 1906. I had pulled a portable engine through the parade and I am standing on the engine. This is only a part of the engines as we always have about 25.'

JOHN BERGREEN, 4564 E. San Gabriel Avenue, Fresno, California 93726 writes: 'On page 14 of September-October Iron Men Album, there is a photo of an engine and several people. There is no identity of the engine. This is a Reeves cross compound, 20 horsepower, manufactured 1905 or 1910 or thereabouts. My father and his sons had a 32-110 Reeves at Osage, Saskatchewan. I ran it threshing 1925-1935. Of course, the Reeves is my choice of the engines. If possible, let me know who has this Reeves engine.' (Read on John, further in the column, as Mel Grenvik has that answer in letter.)